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FEATURE - FLIGHT SIMULATION


BY LYN BURKS, JESSICA PARKER AND NICK MAYHEW


Remember the days when only those


“high-fallutin” multi-engine helicopter drivers had the chance to train in heli- copter simulators. For years, only pilots flying larger helicopters, such as the Sikorsky S76 or the Bell 412, were graced with such opportunities to perform tail rotor failures and engine fires from the relative safety of a simulator. As goes the rest of the world, advances in technology, combined with accommodating regula- tions have brought the world of simula- tion down to the real-world-level of pri- mary training schools. Nowadays, one can fly an instrument approach into Newark, NJ in an R22 simulator just as easily as in the S76 simulator. In this arti- cle, I asked two primary flight training schools to share how they use simulators to enhance their business and deliver flight training to their customers.


The Mountain Ridge Helicopters Perspective – Logan, Utah


We have 200 hours in the helicopter,


100 ground lessons and five checkrides combined with a multitude of challenges, rewards and commitments to get a civil- ian flight school student ready to truly take the controls as PIC. Without a doubt, there is tremendous pressure and an enormous amount of collective effort. The saying, “It takes a village” couldn’t be more accurate than in the training envi- ronment. As an industry, we rely on our Chief Flight Instructors to develop com- prehensive curriculum and implement safe operating procedures that are effec- tive but don’t choke the training process. Quality operating


procedures will


include “trial and error” opportunities as an important component of their cur- riculum, which is one reason why we place the most amount of trust in our flight instructors. They are the people


41 ROTORCRAFTPRO.COM


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