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affordable, state of the art equipment in our facility was the primary driver in our decision making process. In fact, it was the third piece of training equipment we purchased. We chose a FLYIT Simulator, which has since become a key component to our comprehensive program. We wanted to give the instructors this additional tool because it gave them the ability to create real world, scenario based training situ- ations. These scenarios not only gave students a much bet- ter understanding of instrument flying, but made the tran- sition into IFR training in the real aircraft much easier and more efficient. In addition to using the FTD for procedural training, we


opted to use it to simulate scenarios that are outside of our local flight training environment. An “outside” scenario might include flying to an offshore oil platform while expe- riencing deteriorating weather enroute to the rig. The FLYIT is not just limited to IFR training. We place students in situations that could not be realistically and/or safely duplicated in the helicopter, which allowed us to test their decision making process on a more intense level. Without an FTD, this level of intensity would never be experienced in a non-emergency situation. Another factor in purchasing a FLYIT was to make


instrument training cost effective for our students. At our altitude in Logan, Utah, an R22 instrument trainer is impractical. We needed an alternative for students to avoid spending a small fortune on R44 time. The FTD was the perfect solution. At Mountain Ridge, we view the FTD as a helicopter. Hobbs is tracked and maintenance is performed.


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