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Above: FLYIT Professional Helicopter Simulator


LOACATED AT THE INSTRUCTOR’S FINGERTIP IS A PANEL OF BUTTONS THAT WE CALL THE “GOD BUTTONS”.


Just like a helicopter, emergency situations happen


or they are created. Located at the instructor’s fingertip is a panel of buttons that we call the “God Buttons”. For example,


tail rotor failure, alternator failure, warning


lights and noises can all be simulated while flying an instrument approach. These scenarios are duplicated in the simulator,


Therefore, time spent in the FTD is worthwhile. Since the FAA stamped their approval for simulators to be used toward an instrument rating, FTD’s offer the opportunity for students to pursue this rating, in part, without the distraction of the helicopter.


chooses to exercise this option, the transition from the FTD into the R44 is painless.


FEBRUARY 2012 44 without real world consequences. As most instrument pilots will tell you, holds are If a students


probably one of the more difficult procedures to master. If you get behind, things go bad rather quickly. There have been several occasions where students have strug- gled with holds in the helicopter. Our FLYIT offered an option by allowing us to explain the procedure using an FTD. We were then able to reintroduce the process by slowing it, pausing it and breaking it down at a pace where the student could master it. In doing so, we take the fear out of the procedure, the student understands the purpose and they are able to build confidence. It is much easier to accomplish proficiency in the FTD, and overall the process takes less time. In the end, it is more cost effective for the student and the school.


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