This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Interior of the S-92 Simulator located at FlightSafety International’s Learning Center. Photo: Lyn Burks


SIMULATOR MANUFACTURERS CAN USE REPURPOSED COCKPITS OR IN SOME INSTANCES, FABRICATE FIBERGLASS OR PLASTIC COCKPITS.


THE COCKPIT Simulator manufacturers can use repurposed cock-


pits or in some instances, fabricate fiberglass or plastic cockpits. Over the years, many original equipment manu- facturers (OEM) have established alliances with flight training providers and simulator manufacturers. CAE, FlightSafety, Boeing and Rockwell are training providers that manufacture their own simulators. Simulators can be built without the cooperation of


the OEM. However, this often turns into a drawn out reverse engineering drill adding time and expense. Equipment has to be bought, and then it has to be inte- grated into the other simulator systems. Another aspect that can’t be understated is the availability of “data”.


If it FEBRUARY 2012 28


isn’t available through the OEM, then it has to be collect- ed from a real aircraft at considerable expense. This may lead to an arrangement with a customer to provide a line aircraft for the collection of flight data and this is very expensive.


THE PROCESSOR Another improvement involves the processors. Just as


home computer chips have gotten faster and smaller over the past 20 years, so have the chips used in simulation. At one time, a high end simulator required a large room to handle the computer cabinets and environmental control units. All that processing power was dependent on the availability of electrical power that could only be provid-


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60