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Mare Sparks produced. She also notes that an older mare can give you an older,


not trendy, bloodline. “Dynamo is good blood—it’s Don Carlos. You don’t see Don Carlos now, because it’s pushed so far back. Those old lines eventually get diluted.” Debbie remarks, “I wouldn’t hesitate to buy a mare that’s 12 to 15 that has a super bloodline—something special I couldn’t get here or which couldn’t be replaced.” She imported the KWPN Keur mare, Ovanta II (Wellington-G Ramiro Z). “She had already produced national Keur foals—she had a real history of quality. Make sure you really


research the pedigree. Find out about the offspring,” she advises. Anne also suggests, “If


you’re going to buy from a breeder who might have sisters or the mother, find out what the other siblings have done.” She uses as an example another imported mare, Grace. “Every one of her babies in Germany has shown at least through S-level jumping. She might not have a record, but all her foals do.” With a proven mare,


SELECTION BY QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY A breeder may have plenty of top foals from a teenage mare and look to make room for the fillies. They may even produce better than the mother, and they’re younger. Judy tells about her Trakehner mare, Helena: “I paid $11,500 for her in 1977, because on her pedigree, you can read on the dam line the two numbers, 11/12. That means 11 live foals of 12 breeding years. That’s so important to the Trakehner association. They honor their mare lines. Fertility is the most important thing—the best money you can spend is on a good fertile mare. Helena had 15 live foals for me. Her daughters and her daughters’ daughters are my family.”


Judy mentions a Rubin- Lidin, the Dutch mare owned by Debbie Malcolmson.


stein daughter that also represents a very fertile mare line. “She breeds on foal heat with one dose of frozen semen. Her daughter does the same thing. Those kind of mares are very valuable.” Debbie notes that in the


you have some history to see what bloodlines complement hers. “See what kind of stallion works or does not work with her,” says Debbie. “From the breeder’s perspective, it answers two questions: Does this mare produce the type of offspring you want, and what type of stallion does she need? A maiden mare may or may not be able to produce the kind of quality offspring you are looking to breed, and you will need to ‘experiment’ in the beginning to determine what type of stallion will work for her. Buying a known quantity eliminates guesswork, saves time, and hopefully avoids breeding mistakes.” Anne gives the example of a bloodline that tends to pass on a shorter, steeper hip. A mare may not show that conformation herself, yet “throw it” in her foals. “Even three generations back, it pops out in a foal. It’s very dominant.”


Arena, a Thoroughbred owned by Anne Sparks.


Netherlands, you can research the mare’s production record. “You can see if the mare has a solid history of getting in foal every year, or every other year. You can see the foal report.” You can find teenage


mares of high quality. Horses Unlimited’s Wikita produced two foals that were champions of their AHS inspections: Pikka Winna by Pik L (2003), and Galeno, sired


by Glorioso (2006). Pikka Winna became an Elite Mare Candidate in 2009. At the 2007 AHS inspection, judge Judy Hedreen commented on this mare’s Pik L foal, Pikksie Wish: “A very nice mover. She moves under herself well and has good reach in her feet—very athletic.” Anne also sells homebred broodmares because


she already has foals by them. An example is Nuestra Sonrisa (2002, Noble Champion-Capitol I). “I have her Pik L daughter, and I own her mother and her full sister. Her daughter is much finer than she is. I put Pik L on that


Warmbloods Today 83


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