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Eventing Success or Failure Corner By Judy Wardrope


point of view


competed on the international stage for several years. He was fifth in the Young Horse World Championships in 2006, was the youngest horse to win an FEI World Cup Eventing qualifier (2007), was a member of the gold medal team at the 2008 Olympics (where the photo was taken) and most recently competed in the 2010 World Equestrian Games. The other competed nationally in the Young Event Horse category, finishing fourth, but will not be an international competitor. The chestnut is usually in the


B


top half of the field after dressage, moves up the rankings after cross country and seldom has a fault in stadium. His sire was an international jumper and has sired both jumpers and eventers at the upper levels. The grey is from the same sire line but did not


inherit the superior build of the chestnut—not only for ability, but also for soundness and longevity. If we look at the structural differences, we can


see that the rear triangles are different. The chestnut shows a slightly shorter ilium (point of hip to point of buttock) while the grey shows a shorter femur (point of buttock to stifle protrusion). The shorter ilium construction is something we see in horses with dressage ability, but the shorter femur leads to additional stress from hock to ground. Both geldings show the longest side of the rear


triangle from point of hip to stifle protrusion, which is in keeping with the ability to jump from a gallop as opposed to having to rock back and coil before jumping. The stifles of each are well below the bottom of


the sheath, a trait for scope over fences and a long, ground-covering stride.


66 January/February 2011


oth of these Irish Sport Horse geldings are related through the sire line. One has


The line depicting the pillar of support (drawn up and down through the naturally occurring groove in the forearm) emerges well in front of the withers on both geldings for lightness of the forehand, but does not emerge in the same place at the bottom end. The chestnut’s pillar emerges into the rear quarter of the hoof, the ideal place for soundness and longevity. The grey’s pillar of support emerges behind the hoof, which adds stress to the suspensory apparatus (tendons and ligaments) of the foreleg and makes him more likely to strike his fetlock on the ground with excessive force, making him more susceptible to break down. Both have good rise to the humerus from elbow


to point of shoulder and a base of neck well above the point of shoulder for lightness of the forehand. They differ in the muscle development over the


elbow with the grey showing more development. Muscle development in that area instead of over the


Conformation


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