This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
➡ Blue Hors Matine ldi ➡ Totilas


EH Gribaldi, sire to Totilas, competed to Grand Prix and died in early 2010. © Sportfotos Lafrentz


Silvermoon, sire to Blue Hors Matine. Photo courtesy www.superiorequinesires.com


Totilas, the current world champion dressage horse, recently sold to German Paul Schockemöhle. Photo by Kit Houghton/FEI


requires attention to conformation and movement traits that emphasize well-muscled forearms with greater dynamic range of motion. This is a remarkable departure from traditional views and calls into question our understanding of the role of the hind legs. Two hundred years ago, the old masters were


fascinated by and preoccupied with the ability of the hind legs to flex the three joints (hip, stifle and hock) and achieve the highest degree of collection in order to execute the airs above ground. During


The mare, Blue Hors Matine by Silvermoon. Photo © Cealy Tetley


the 19th century that fascination gave way to a more intense exploration of ground airs. During that time, the tempi changes of leads were invented, and in addition trainers experimented with movements like canter on three legs (and backwards), reverse pirouettes, passage backwards and many more. For historical reasons, by the mid 20th century the degree of collection required for modern dressage training became limited to the requirements of the modern sport. Recent fascination with flashy foreleg


Warmbloods Today 77


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