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the front end to peak itself over the contact and relax. That is why the Iberians are attracted to the French method of dressage. The French believe in lowering the intensity of the aids so that the horse releases into the bit rather than gets driven into the bit.”


Specific Veigas One of the most favored Veiga bloodlines for dressage comes from a stallion Bailador. Even at the age of 20, he required four men with ropes to walk him to the breeding shed. This super macho fellow, untouchable in the bull ring, reaches back in his pedigree to a famous Veiga mare, Laranja I who was also granddam of the Veiga horse Emir about whom it is said, “there never has been anything bad after Emir,” quotes Bettina. During the Portuguese revolution 1974-75, Emir


ABOVE: The stallion Xarik Interagro owned by Katherine Cook and Legendary Lusitanos, a lovely example of the Veiga- Andrade mix. Photo courtesy Katherine Cook


RIGHT: Medalha, an example of Portuguese and Brazilian lines crossed here in the U.S. Photo by Lynndee Kemmet


for the big flying changes to match the Warmblood. If Mrs. Smith wants to ride a nice Lusitano of working equitation type, she shouldn’t force it into a range of motion that opposes its biomechanics.” With the Veiga horse’s ability to leap with the grace of


a cat and give an electric response to the rider’s leg, the Veiga-Andrade mystique can be blinding if a breeder is not careful to add the right Veiga to the mix. “If you want a dressage horse, you won’t want the hotter, smaller, feistier, shorter legged, quicker, more temperamental of that lineage,” advises Bettina. “Some modern breeders are a bit careless because


they put together certain bloodlines without seeing if the individual horse hops off and is electrified from the leg. These are not traits you want for modern dressage.” She describes that trait as seen especially in a chaotic, quick canter. “A hotter horse has a tendency to come underneath


so quickly that he gets stuck and over engaged. He feels trapped. The key is to get them underneath, but to get


60 January/February 2011


and other Veiga and Andrade horses were imported to France to found French breeding lines. Offsprings Spartacus RBO competed internationally and Orphee with Catherine Durand Henriquet competed on the French dressage team in the Barcelona Olympics. “The Emir


bloodlines throw exactly the same: more suspension and grace in the front end. They throw big walks


and a beautiful aesthetic type. If you like that, you go to that because they are true every time,” says Bettina. Another Veiga bloodline is the Dardo. “The Dardo line is adorable. They are cream puffs. And they’re taller and leggier than the bull fighting lines. They are the kindest of the Veiga lines with beautiful refined face and beautiful eyes,” says Drummond. Maravilha Veigas are another. Bettina rehabilitated


the Maravilha stallion Quarteto do Top for FEI level dressage that later went to Gunter Seidel to show. “The word in Portugal is that a little bit of Maravilha goes a long way. The bloodline has a longer loin and shorter croup.” While such a topline can produce an expressive trot, it can take away from the ease in which the horse can flex his hindquarter joints for pirouettes, piaffe and passage.


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