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“God used the kittens and all the four-leggeds on the farm to start my heart smiling again when I wasn’t sure it ever would.”


However, knowing that I had animals to feed got me moving, and I gradually began to realize how much being with the horses, dogs, and cats helped me. It is truly impossible to wallow in grief while watching kittens chase a wisp of hay that a breeze is pushing down the barn aisle! God used the kittens and all the four-leggeds on the farm to start my heart smiling again when I wasn’t sure it ever would.” Stephanie believes that there are many people living in all kinds of circumstance that could benefit from the same kind of four-legged encouragement and wants to use the farm as a medium for that connection. Megan R. Bouscher, the Occupational Therapy


in her heart and an understanding of the horse’s needs. Instead of focusing solely on the discipline of dressage, Stephanie rode him on trails and showed him in the hunter ring as well. “They became two happy souls together,” Leslie concluded. With Leslie’s help, Stephanie and Insterfurst competed successfully through Fourth Level in dressage and the stallion was instrumental in Stephanie earning her USDF Bronze medal. Now 28 and retired, Insterfurst occupies a front paddock at the entrance to the 28-acre farm and is the farm expert in teaching young children how to feed treats to horses.


Connecting Horse and Human Currently, Trinity Farm’s 14-stall barn, one paddock and three large pastures provide homes for 18 horses, three of which fall under the auspices of The Shepherd’s Corner. Just like a biblical shepherd, Stephanie cares for animals whose owners can no longer care for them. Together with a small group of people, Stephanie developed the organization to help horses, but also to provide humans with a connection to the four-legged animals that have given Stephanie so much in return. Stephanie remarks, “When my husband, Don, died in 2006, I had a hard time getting out of bed some mornings.


ABOVE: Stephanie and her 28-year-old retired Trakehner stallion Insterfurst. RIGHT: A special needs boy brushes a horse for the first time. Photo by Megan Bouscher. (Farm photos by Susan Rose Marcus)


Warmbloods Today 71


Supervisor at Helping Hands Center for Special Needs in Columbus, can attest to the amazing ability animals have to assist her autistic students. Megan met Stephanie through a maze of people when Megan found it neces- sary to get rid of her dog, and Stephanie agreed to provide a good home for the Lab mix. “I felt God had a hand in our relationship,” Megan admits. When the two


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