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long free-flowing manes, elevated moments and striking agility challenging all threats and dangers with indomitable courage…”


The Andrades The second half of the dressage cross, the Andrade, results from the breeding program of Dr. Ruy D’Andrade, a Portuguese zoologist, paleontologist and historian credited with reviving the Alter Real Lusitano and rediscovering in 1920 the prehistoric ancestor of the Lusitano, the Sorraia. He described his stock as “short strong horses, valiant with the bulls, changing from calm to ardent if spurred and from ardent to obedient if left in peace; fast when running and rapid on turns; with good walk sensible to the spurs, submissive with good mouth, endless strength in everything.” (See the sidebar, The History of the Mix, for more detailed information.)


Form and Function “The Andrades are sturdier with big bone and big neck. They are heavier boned and were sometimes used for farm work in Portugal,” explains Lusitano dressage trainer and breeder


Bettina Drummond who trained and rode for the famed Portuguese dressage master Nuno Oliveira for 17 years. Today she breeds and trains out of the Pruyn Stud in Washington, Connecticut. With the Veiga horses the particular Veiga bloodline


matters in the making of the individual. Some are built for dressage; some for working equitation, and some for bull fighting. Drummond explains by looking at the croup angle. The angle of croup of a working equitation horse is sometimes too short and does not necessarily work well for a lower level dressage horse. “Working equitation, ridden one-handed, requires a horse that stays off the reins, is bred to sit with a very short cut off croup and an upright, shorter front end. These horses can pirouette on a dime. They are quick behind and up in front, giving the impression of collection much faster. You can catch a quick passage, put your hand on your belt and look cool for the ladies. But they don’t necessarily have the elastic reach and medium range of a dressage horse because they are built too upright and too underneath themselves.” The bull fight horse has a deep croup fitting the biomechanical needs of an upper level dressage horse while facilitating the jet propulsion from a standstill mandatory in the bull ring.


Choosing a type of horse that is not biomechanically designed for the job can prove frustrating for the horse and rider, but also injurious to the horse. “Some Lusitanos not formed for dressage have gone to FEI level dressage, but have suffered from sciatica and suspensory issues when asked


OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: Allison Mathy on Xirope, the Dressage Champion at the Fiesta of the Spanish Horse, in Burbank, CA, May of 2010. He’s a purebred Lusitano bred in Spain. Photo by Tass, courtesy Allison Mathy


OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: Bettina on a wonderful mare Granada du Plessis also called “Mimi.” She is Veiga from the Emir line. Photo by Mark Abelle


ABOVE, TWO TOP IMAGES: Bettina and Mimi are used for testing the piaffe at the McPhail Center with Dr. Hilary Clayton. They used a special German saddle pad that registers back roundness and rider balance as well as tectonic plates registering the depth and cleanliness of the piaffer form. The mare did four days in a row of patient piaffe work indoors without any resistance. LEFT: Mimi has a newborn colt Galante out of a sire which is mostly Andrade. Bettina and Galante become friends in the grass. Photo by John Campbell


Warmbloods Today 59


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