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ublisher’sWelcome Is the WEG finally over?


t came and went. Te 2010 Alltech World Equestrian Games (WEG) finished on schedule in October in our very own Kentucky. For years there was abundant planning, investing, building, educating, marketing


and organizing by the Alltech team. Tons of press coverage and hype ensued. Many international athletes, both human and equine, prepped and prepped for a very long time. Te competitors were excellent and, thankfully, no one was seriously injured. Since we were going to press with our November/December issue during the Games, it pushed our coverage


of the event into this issue. Not to worry; we don’t publish show results since they are readily available online. However we took this opportunity to uncover many fascinating stories of these wonderful athletes to share with you. Aſter all, that is the strength of our publication: capturing the special relationship and connection people have with their sport horses. Besides the obvious excitement of watching the teams in action, the WEG proved to be pivotal with potentially


long lasting results for our industry. First, network television in the U.S., namely NBC Sports, broadcast portions of most of the sports for three Sundays in a row. Universal Sports aired even more than NBC Sports. Tis airtime in the average American home is exciting for the exposure and recognition of our less-than-popular horse sports. Second, the dressage performances of the fabulous Totilas and Edward Gal, followed by the shocking record- breaking sale of this dressage phenomenon, rippled through cyberspace. So much so that the news crippled dressage websites everywhere. Dr. Guy’s “Point of View” article inside WT underscores how this horse and the future of breeding Warmbloods have taken a new turn. Tird, awareness of the fierce competition that our para-dressage riders face in international competition has been recognized. Te bottom line is that these equestrians need well- trained international quality horses handed down from our able-bodied riders, a common practice in Europe. And last, less conventional sport horse breeds are now in the limelight as producing top winners. For example, fiſth in dressage was Spain’s PRE stallion Fuego XII, whose exciting dressage freestyle brought 25,000 roaring spectators to their feet. (‘What’s a PRE,’ many people have asked me.) German Michael Jung rode La Biosthetique—Sam FBW, a Baden-Württemburg gelding to the eventing gold. Tis was not a freak win; the pair had already won numerous championships in 2010 in Europe and their score at the WEG won by a healthy margin starting with their excellent dressage score. And many are not aware that the amazing Dutch-bred Totilas is actually half Trakehner. Even though the WEG still triggers memories of parking fiascos, inconsistently priced tickets, mediocre food


and friendly volunteers that couldn’t answer most of my questions, I personally loved the event. As these logistical memories fade, something much more important becomes clear: the legacy of America’s first WEG will have a lasting influence on our industry’s breeding, judging and competing. My guess is that the World Equestrian Games will stay alive for quite some time. And that’s good news for all of us.


Liz Cornell, Publisher


Our Mission: Warmbloods Today is the only magazine in North America focused on the entire spectrum of Warmblood breeds. It’s a place where people from all aspects of the sport horse community can come together: amateurs, owners, trainers and breeders. Each issue contains interesting, informative and often heart-warming stories of peoples’ experiences with their horses, along with thought-provoking opinions from various professionals and amateurs. We cover all horses from European descent bred for the sports of jumping, dressage, eventing and driving including the Iberian breeds and American Warmbloods.


8 January/February 2011


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