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Quarteto do Top was instrumental in shifting Linda


Walton of Brookside Lusitanos in Walnut, California, to the breed from Warmbloods. A USDF gold medal grand prix rider, Linda trained with Olympian Gunther Seidel for 20 years. “I always liked the looks of the Lusitano and then had the opportunity to ride Quarteto. Then I rode some horses of Joao Oliveira’s and I was sold.” (Joao Oliveira was Nuno Oliveira’s son. He was the trainer at Brookside until his death in 2007.) Linda and husband Keith attended an auction


in Brazil looking for a horse for Linda and others to market at home. On that trip she was offered an Andrade stallion, Pensamento, to campaign for two years then sell. She ended up winning with him in open Grand Prix classes, bought him for herself and never looked back. Since then she has bought horses in Brazil and Portugal to sell and to breed. Among them have been pure Veigas, pure Andrades and Veiga- Andrade mixes.


Temperament and Rideability “We buy horses according to how good their brains are and how they move. These horses are more willing. They seem to want to go out and work. Starting them is easier. When you train you don’t have to use more and more leg, more and more half halts. You learn to ride with less leg and more finesse,” Linda explains. “It’s as if they know on their own


how to half halt and come underneath themselves,” she continues. “In truth, a lot of time you’re just checking the horse, not rebalancing. Maybe because the Lusitano is so balanced, the half halt is easier.”


Horse shoppers often call Linda about the Veigas and


their presumed hotness. “I explain that my experience has not shown them to be so hot. They are very good horses. Veigas have gotten a bad rap. I don’t think we’re that educated yet on that breeding. The Veigas we have had are very typey. It’s a look I like: 15.2, 15.3, compact, agile, and very smart. They are sensitive in a good way, and they go forward.” Lusitano and Andalusian breeder Tina Cristiani Veder


of Caballos de los Cristiani agrees. “In Brazil and Portugal the Veiga was always important and was always looked up to as athletic. They’re like cats: emotional and agile and smart. The training has to be correct because they are very intelligent. They are fearless, and often athletic contortionists. They had to be quick or they wouldn’t survive in the bull ring. Children in Portugal ride Veiga stallions, but the pure Veiga without proper training is not a good amateur horse. It’s necessary to understand the horse and the training.” In Tina’s opinion the Andrade has the look of a Spanish horse. “They are bigger and rounder with a head not as convex. As for the mix she says, “The Veigas are very prepotent; they stamp on their look. The Andrade would quiet down the Veiga which is a responsive, keen horse. The Veiga is like a special spice you add. I’ve seen some fabulous Veiga-Andrades for dressage, and some that are not. Learn


BOTTOM LEFT: Quarteto do Top, a very popular Veiga- Andrade stallion here in the U.S., here ridden by Bettina Drummond. Photo by Brenda V. Cataldo/ Moments In Time BOTTOM RIGHT: Vaquarias (aka Cielo) by Quarteto do Top ridden by Allison Mathy. TOP: Zembraso also by Quarteto do Top ridden by Allison Mathy.


Warmbloods Today 61


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