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Insurance


PARKING HEALTH SAFETY Teaching Your Employees Safety


By Kathy Phillips


Don’t assume your employees will know what to do in the event of an emergency or how to handle a dangerous situ-


ation. Parking operators and valets should be aware of what pre- cautions to take and how to react to unsafe circumstances. Education and training programs are required by the federal


Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and by necessary elements for employers interested in controlling work- er’s compensation costs and third-party liability claims. As with all safety management systems, training and com-


munication programs should be integrated within your organiza- tion’s management structure – with the goal of becoming part of your organization’s culture – to ensure that programs are effec- tive and generate a positive return on invested resources. The following eight steps are helpful training tips and guide-


lines to improve safety and security processes: 1. Ensure that cashiers and attendants handling cash are


competent in security systems such as proper use of drop boxes and other practices necessary so as not to draw attention to them- selves when handling money.


2. Have rigid policies and instruct employees on how to


properly react to and handle an attempted robbery or theft. Employees should never put themselves in a position that would compromise their personal safety or threaten their life. 3. All parking attendants should understand the basics of


surveillance systems to include placement of cameras and instructions on how the alarm system works and sounds. (For example, if the alarm system uses silent alarms, attendants must be aware of all the attributes of the system, just as if the alarm operated using lights or bells.) 4. Instruct personnel on the proper methods of handling loi-


terers, which may include using radios to notify local security and/or police. Employees should understand that they are not to interact with loiterers in a policing fashion and should communi- cate suspicious acts via provided communication systems. 5. Provide security escorts for employees to their vehicles or


other public transportation at the close of shifts during non-day- light hours. 6. Require attendants to wear orange or yellow vests when


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