This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Q & A: Mike Tagliapietra Mike Tagliapietra may have earned his quota at World Championships, but he wanted to win it. That’s not going to stop


him from proving in 2015 he’s the right guy to fi ll that quota slot. Sure he’s a competitive guy – he would have rather won the quota slot, than by earning it by virtue of a place in the 25m Sport Pistol Final – so he’s pushing to win the IPC World Cups in the coming year. That competitiveness doesn’t mean he doesn’t want to see a large, strong USA Shooting Team in Rio. “Now more people have chances to earn quotas,” he said. “John (Joss – rifl e athlete and last year’s USA Shooting Paralym-


pic Athlete of the Year) has a good shot. Nothing has changed in how (McKenna and I) support our teammates – we’ve always supported them. If I’m not doing well, I’m watching Shaun (Tichenor) and wanting him to do the best he possibly can. It would be so cool to have more quotas. The more the merrier!” A year since they became teammates, he says he’s learned how his approach to a match has changed, how his scores


have gone up and how he controls his emotions going into a match. “You have gotten a lot better, Sunshine,” McKenna jokes...


McKenna: What did you do before you got into shooting? Mike: I was living in Arizona going to school part time at ASU. I also was involved with Arizona Disabled Sports as an athlete and coach. As an athlete, I competed in marathons and triathlons – more than 30 road races from 2010-2012.


McKenna: How did you get into shooting? Mike: I got into shooting in 1995, while working at Mercury Marine in my hometown of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin when my boss asked me if I wanted to join the local team. I had never shot pistol before and found it very challenging. I shot with that team for three years.


McKenna: What is your favorite part about travelling and why? Mike: I’m assuming you mean traveling for competition. Tough ques- tion – It would be the competing, developing friendships with all the other athletes & coaches, and visiting other countries and cultures. If I have to choose one, it would be developing friendships with people from other countries. As Jesse Owens put it “a medal is a trinket, its luster will fade, but friendships will last forever.”


McKenna: What is the hardest obstacle you face in training? Mike: I used to compete in sports that required more physical than mental training. Shooting is the oppo- site - Mental training is almost more important than the physical because you have to main- tain such a high level of focus throughout the match. I wouldn’t consider this an obstacle, but maintaining this high level of focus is my biggest challenge right now.


McKenna: What is your favorite thing to do at the Olympic Training Center – besides training (obviously…) and why? Mike: I swim a couple days a week at 5:30 in the morning. I enjoy it because it’s great exercise and it’s mentally relaxing at the same time.


Year in Review 2014 | USA Shooting News 61


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84