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JO 2014 National Junior Olympic Championships


USA Shooting’s Future In Good Hands Based on 2014 National Junior Olympic Shooting Championships Results


We have witnessed the


future, and in this instance, it looks pretty good. USA Shooting’s yearly glimpse at the shooting prospects that lie ahead concluded on Saturday, April 26 with the Men’s Three-Position Rifl e event. Thirteen days of April shooting competi- tion brought together over 360 competitors in men’s and women’s pistol and rifl e events. The excitement never


waned throughout those 13 days and the event con- cluded with a dramatic fi nal that saw the rapid-rising Tim Sherry (Highlands Ranch, Colorado) overcome a large defi cit in the standing posi- tion to overtake Josh Mar- tin (Hershey, Pennsylvania). Sherry would need the win to overtake both David Higgins (Camp Pendleton, California) and Lucas Kozeniesky (Ra- leigh, North Carolina) for second-place overall. Mar- tin would fi nish second in the fi nal and sixth overall. Champions at this year’s


NJOSC were determined through a modifi ed selection format similar to that of USA Shooting’s National Cham- pionships: Competitors are awarded points each day based on their qualifying score with additional points awarded for performance in the Final – Eight for fi rst, seven for second and so on.


West Virginia’s Garrett Spurgeon (Canton, Mis- souri) would gain some revenge on Sherry with a superlative qualifying score that put him 12 points ahead of his nearest com- petitor. Spurgeon fi nished second in the event to Sher- ry at the NCAA Rifl e Cham- pionships in March while helping lead West Virginia to its historic 16th NCAA team title. Spurgeon also picked up a second-place fi nish be- hind Sherry in the Air Rifl e event. He fi nished fourth in each fi nal, but proved throughout the week that his level of concentration in the grueling qualifying rounds is unmatched. Another impressive per-


formance was provided by Alexander Chichkov (Temple Terrace, Florida)


16 USA Shooting News | Year in Review 2014


who won both pistol events contested. In addition, USA Shooting welcomed six new National Junior Team mem- bers to its ranks based on shooter performances dur- ing NJOSC. New additions in pistol include Justin Ahn (Diamond Bar, California), Taylor Gallegos (Prosper, Texas) and Irina Andriano- va (Schaumburg, Illinois). In Rifl e, three new female athletes earned their jacket including Abby Votava (Colo- rado Springs, Colorado, pic- tured above), Lauren Phil- lips (Seabeck, Washington) and Lorelie Stanfi eld (Fair- banks, Alaska). The competitors in the


open division get most of the glory, but the results in the youngest age division (J3), which features shoot- ers 14 years or younger, ac-


tually stole the show during the Men’s Three-Position Rifl e event. Alec Patajo (Puyallup, Washington) and Peter Fiori (Lebanon, New Jersey) both equaled the J3 national record in the event with scores of 1136, which four-time Olympian and 2004 Olympic silver medal- ist Mike Anti called “mighty impressive” during the med- al ceremony. Both Patajo and Fiori fi nished 1-2 in the Air Rifl e event as well. For the fi rst time, NJOSC


competitors were treated to the thrill of shooting on electronic targets as USA Shooting underwent a mas- sive range upgrade in late 2013 to install a new target system, improve lighting and enhance the spectator expe- rience. Improving the range even more was the debut of


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