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e the Kilowatt OCTOBER 2013 Find Us On Facebook


published monthly for members of Kiwash Electric Cooperative, Inc.


A SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Kiwash Electric's Facebook page is great place to check in with your co-op, report outages or service problems, and get quick updates on co-op programs and activities. Please stop by. We "tweet," too!


ENERGY EFFICIENCY


Tip of


Keep wintry drafts out of your home by sealing cracks and gaps. Weather stripping around doors and windows works well when you can see daylight between the frame and the wall or floor. Use caulk to seal around the frames where you see gaps.


For more tips and tricks, visit


TogetherWeSave.com. the Month A


s the federal government pushes power plants to comply with


stricter emission regulations, Kiwash Electric Cooperative and other co-ops across the country are pushing back by educating co-op members about the issue and how it could affect their future electric rates.


At Action.coop, co-op members are encouraged to watch a short video explaining the electric cooperative position on the issue and its potential impact on ratepayers. On the home page, co-op members can sign up for email alerts and updates on these and other issues that threaten the reliability and affordability of their rural electric service.


U.S. rely on electricity that is generated using coal.


70%


Electric co-op members will also find resources and information on federal legislative and regulatory issues at www.nreca. coop, the newly redesigned website of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.


Seventy percent of electric cooperative members across the nation rely on electricity that is generated using coal. As mandated by the federal Clean Air Act, coal-fired plants must reduce coal emissions by 50 percent by 2015.


of electric co-op members in the


Website Urges Members To Act


Visit Action.coop to learn how to fight against costly EPA regulations that could raise your electric rates


Electric utilities contend that compliance with this mandate is impossible without significant and costly advances in technology. The technology needed hasn't even been developed, much less tested.


Co-ops fear the regulations will eliminate coal as a generating fuel completely, and force power plants to rely more heavily on natural gas, which is prone to volatile price swings.


Electric co-ops advocate a balanced mix of generating fuels that includes natural gas, hydro power, renewables, and coal. This reasoning prevents dependence on one fuel source, and helps ensure the most affordable prices for electric co-op members.


BILL PAYMENT LOCATIONS


Kiwash Electric 120 W. 1st Street Cordell, Oklahoma


Pay online:


www.kiwash.coop Custer City Hall


Custer City, Oklahoma


First National Bank Thomas, Oklahoma


Co-op Leader Les Hinds Retires K


iwash Electric Cooperative Trustee Leslie


Hinds announced his decision to retire from the cooperative board of trustees, effective September 25, 2013.


Hinds was appointed to the Kiwash Electric board in 1968. He has since held several leadership positions, including president


of the board.He also served 37 years on the Western Farmer's Electric Cooperative board, and 20 years on the Burns Flat Co-op Gin board.


Raised on a farm near Burns Flat, Hinds still remembers what it was like to live without electricity. These memories fueled his desire to serve his electric co-op, and deepened


his appreciation for the co-op mission.


Hinds said he always considered it a privilege to serve as a Kiwash director. Co-op members, employees and fellow trustees who know him would argue that the privilege was all theirs.


Thank you, Les Hinds, for your inspring legacy of service!


Leslie Hinds


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