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Power Continued from Page 19


Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Headquartered in Amarillo, Texas, GSEC was organized in 1984 to provide low-cost, reliable electric service for its distribution cooperative members. GSEC serves 16 member systems in an area covering 24 percent of the Texas landmass, plus the Oklahoma Panhandle, serving Tri-County Electric Cooperative. GSEC owns a 480-megawatt, natu- ral gas-fired combined cycle generating plant in Denver City, Texas, as well as several 150-megawatt combustion turbine-generator units and one 163-megawatt combustion turbine-generator, a 168-megawatt generating facility located near Abernathy, Texas, and Golden Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch, a 78-megawatt wind facility made up of 34 wind turbines located near Amarillo, Texas. GSEC does not retain any of the renewable at- tributes associated with the wind energy. In 2012, 38 percent of the energy supplied to its members was generated by GSEC using natural gas, while 44 percent was from pur- chase power agreements and 18 percent was from the market. According to President Mark Schwirtz, in the next eight years GSEC plans to invest nearly $1 billion to build new power plants to serve growing loads and replace expiring power contracts.


Powering Communities Currently, G&Ts generate about 5 percent of the nation’s electricity and own all or part of 200 generating plants with a combined capacity of more than 51,000 megawatts— enough electricity to power five cities approximately the size of New York City! Collectively, there are 838 distribution co-ops and 67 G&T co-ops, serving an estimated 42 million people in 47 states. More than 13 percent of the nation’s electric meters are consumers served by electric cooperatives.


“Building Solutions”ions” ...with integrity!


“Building Solutionsttions” ...with integrity!


Overall, 45 percent of the power used by distribution co-ops nationally comes from power plants fully or partially owned by a G&T. In addition, G&Ts own and maintain a national network of 67,101 miles of transmission line to deliver power to local distribu- tion co-ops like yours. Distribution co-ops own and maintain 2.6 million miles of line, 42 percent of the nation’s total. Cooperatives, whether G&Ts or distribution co-ops, operate under the same principles and values. Your cooperative is not just a utility company, but also an active and engaged partner in your community. Oklahoma’s electric cooperatives—including the G&Ts that generate and transmit your power—are fully committed to improving the quality of life of your families and neighbors. Co-ops are committed to work hard to ensure that you have clean, safe, reliable, and affordable electricity. So next time you flip the switch, re- member—your co-op cares.


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MIDWEST STORM SHELTERS


MIDWEST STORM SHELTERS


INGROUND STORM SHELTERS AND SAFEROOMS


Toll Free 1-877-886-5508 20 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


MIDWEST STORM SHELTERS


MIDWEST STORM SHELTERS


3 Distribution Cooperative: An electric cooperative that purchases whole- sale power and delivers it to consumer-members.


3 Generation & Transmission Cooperative (G&T): A power-supply coopera- tive owned by a group of distribution cooperatives. G&Ts generate power or purchase it from public, or investor-owned utilities, or both.


3 Generation plant: A plant that has generators and other equipment for producing electricity.


3 Kilowatt: The basic unit of electric demand, equals 1,000 watts. On aver- age, Oklahoma homes use about 1,000 to 1,250 kilowatt-hours per month.


3 Megawatt: Equal to 1,000 kilowatt-hours or 1 million watt-hours.


3 Power Grid: Interconnected systems that move electricity around the coun- try.


Over 40 Years Experience 10 Year Warranty Included


Our storm shelters are designed and constructed with your protection in mind. They are reinforced with fiber as well as steel rebar, and they are poured with a minimum of 6,000 psi concrete. At no extra charge every storm shelter comes equipped with a double handrail on the steps, a gas operated door closer, 8” wind turbine for ventilation and 6” vent.


Fax 1-918-686-5512


3 Renewable Resources: Souces of energy that are naturally replenishable, including wind, solar, biomass, geothermal and wave energy.


3 Rural Utilities Service (RUS): The U.S. Department of Agriculture agency that lends money to the nation’s consumer-owned electric and telephone co- operatives, formerly known as the Rural Electrification Administration (REA).


3 Substation: An electrical facility containing equipment for controlling the flow of electricity from supplier to user.


3 Transformer: A device used to raise or lower voltage in electric distribution or transmission lines.


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