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Celebrate National Cooperative Month with Northfork Electric ■ October set aside to honor Oklahoma’s 26 co-ops


America during National Cooperative Month.


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Every October, cooperatives are recognized for the qualities that make the business model unique: local democratic control, commitment to supporting the communities they serve and improving quality of life, special benefits and services, and the return of margins (the co-op term for profits) back to members in the form of capital credits.


“Cooperatives are special,” says Scott Copeland, NFEC general manager. “We have an obligation to provide reliable, affordable, and safe electricity, but we take that a step fur- ther. We also have a responsibility to support our members, enrich schools, and enhance our communities.” Northfork Electric is proud to


be part of America’s cooperative network, which employs more than 850,000 people. Across the nation, 29,000 co-ops and credit unions gen- erate $74 billion in annual wages and nearly $500 billion in revenue. Cooperation thrives in Oklahoma, with more than 26 co-ops serving well over 100,000 members, notes the University of 11631-001 Wisconsin’s Center for Cooperation. Oklahoma’s co-op economy employs over 1,000 Oklahomans, and nationally more than 2.1 million jobs are supported by co-ops.


NFEC is one of more than 900


oin Northfork Electric Co-op in celebrating cooperatives in Oklahoma and across


electric cooperatives, public utility districts and public power districts serving 42 million people in 47 states. “Electric cooperatives were formed because rural communities were struggling for lack of invest- ment,” Copeland explains. “Neighbors


banded together and lit up the country- side when no one else would. That’s what we celebrate each October.” In addition to cooperative utili- ties, Oklahoma residents are served cooperatively by credit unions, food co-ops, agricultural co-ops, and more!


Batten the Hatches this Fall


Fall is a great time to walk around your home with weather stripping and a caulk gun and reinforce the seals around windows, doors and other openings in walls that can let cold out- door air into your warm, heated home. Don't overlook your attic's access


hatch.


The attic hatch is usually located in a wall or ceiling of a hallway or closet, so it's sort of "out of sight, out of mind." But those doorways, which often are attached to pull-down steps, leak huge amounts of air, making your home colder in the winter and hotter during summer.


Before it gets too cold outside, seal and insulate the door.


If your hatch is finished with trim around the edges, gently pull the trim off--being careful not to break it--and pump caulk into holes and gaps in the wood. Caulk sparingly around all edges of the trim, and then reattach it to the door. Your attic hatch might have a gas- ket around the edges – similar to the one on your refrigerator door. If yours doesn't, consider adding one. It can create a tight seal that will keep the unconditioned attic air upstairs where it belongs – and out of your house.


If your attic door is not insulated, cut a piece of rigid foam insulation so it's about half an inch smaller than the door on all sides, and glue it to the attic side of the door. Stack another piece of foam on top of that, and then another until the insulation is four to eight inches thick.


Insulation and caulk won't do their jobs unless the door can close tight. Add a handle and a fastener to the door so it latches securely when closed.


Hidden


Account Number If you see your account


number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your electric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newsletter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account


number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


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