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East Central Electric Cooperative Date of Incorporation: November 15, 1938


East Central Oklahoma Electric Cooperative’s


(ECOEC) Articles of Incorporation were approved November 15, 1938. Ten charter members fi led the Articles. The cooperative’s fi rst substation was en- ergized in 1939 in the Bald Hill, Okla., area. The fi rst electric meter was set in December 1939 near Beggs. Okla., on the J.E. Capps’ farm. ECOEC’s service area covers 3,000 square miles and includes portions of Creek, McIntosh, Muskogee, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, Tulsa and Wagoner counties. A seven- member board of trustees who represent seven dif- ferent districts, elected for three-year terms by the member-owners, sets the cooperative’s policies. A manager supervises the operation of the cooperative with the aid of three departments: Member Services, Office Services and Operations & Engineering. Today, ECOEC’s $74,409,000 net electric plant provides service at cost to 32,096 meters through a network of 5,854 miles of power lines and 24 substa- tions. Service crews are stationed in Bixby, Bristow, Checotah, Morris, Muskogee, Okemah and Okmulgee.


Central Rural Electric Cooperative Date of Incorporation: November 17, 1938


In 1938, Central State Rural Electric Cooperative was born as a stock corporation founded by 10 men. At the fi rst meeting the stockholders reported that the Articles of Incorporation were fi led with the Secretary of State, the men agreed on who would serve on a board of directors, a date was set for the fi rst annual meeting, an offi cial seal and bylaws were adopted and a project engineer and attorney were appointed. In 1939, a loan from REA in the amount of $130,000 was secured and allowed for the construction of 155 miles of line to serve 402 consumers. C.H. Guernsey and Co., an engineering fi rm, was hired to stake and oversee the construc- tion of the electrical system. That same year, the name was shortened to Central Rural Electric Cooperative (CREC) and the seal was changed to refl ect the cooperative’s not-for-profi t status. In the 1950s, the headquarters building was built and it is still used to this day. Today, CREC serves more than 18,000 members in the Garfield, Lincoln, Logan, Noble, Oklahoma, Pawnee and Payne Counties with more than 4,000 miles of line.


Harmon Electric Association Date of Incorporation: December 12, 1938


Harmon Electric Cooperative’s fi rst membership application was taken November 30, 1938. On December 12, 1938, the Articles of Incorporation for Harmon Electric were fi led, and on September 11, 1939, the name of the cooperative was changed to Harmon Electric Association, Inc. Ten members composed the fi rst board of trustees and Henry Templeton was the fi rst manager. The fi rst power was purchased from the city of Mangum. On November 24, 1939, 112 miles of line were ener- gized. A report published in the March 1940 Harmon Electric newsletter stated there was a total of 273 pole line miles energized with a total of 435 connected members at that time. Harmon Electric now purchases power from Western Farmers Electric Cooperative. As of November 30, 2012, Harmon Electric has a total of 1,899 miles of line energized with a total of 3,496 connected meters. Harmon provides electricity throughout portions of Harmon, Greer, Jackson, Kiowa and Beckham Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas.


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