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Vol. 64 Number 12


News orthwestern Electric October 2013


October is national cooperative month Help celebrate by shopping co-op


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very October, cooperatives are recognized for the qualities that make the business model unique: local democratic control, com- mitment to supporting the communi- ties they serve and improving quality of life, special benefits and services, and the return of margins back to members in the form of capital credits. Northwestern Electric is proud to be


part of America’s cooperative network, which employs more than 850,000 people. Across the nation, co-ops and credit unions generate $74 billion in annual wages and nearly $500 billion in revenue.


Northwestern Electric is one of more than 900 electric cooperatives in Amer- ica. But we’re just one type of coop- erative—more than 29,200 operate in our country, including a large segment of the agriculture industry. From dairy to oranges, and almonds to cotton, our nation’s farmers know the value of the cooperative business model. The next time you’re at the grocery store, see how many items you can


purchase that were produced by a co- op.


Starting in the produce section, pick up some Ocean Spray cranberries or Sunkist oranges, tangerines, grapes, or grapefruit. (50372002)


Cruise on over to the refrigerated cases and take a look at the eggs—95 percent of America’s eggs are produced and marketed by co-ops. Then pick up some Florida Natural orange juice, Land O’Lakes butter, Cabot or Tilla- mook Cheese, and Organic Valley milk. Need a warm drink? Try Equal Ex- change coffee, tea, and hot chocolate. Finally, drop some Blue Diamond almonds in your cart—a perfect pick- me-up for that 3 p.m. slump. Now that you’ve finished your gro- cery shopping, make your way to Ace Hardware or True Value to get supplies for your weekend projects. Or replace your old, falling-apart blue jeans with a new pair from GAP, Banana Repub- lic, or Guess—all three get their cotton from Plains Cotton Growers Coopera- tive’s Denimatrix. But before you do


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Inside


Lawrence retires...........2 Missing members.........3 Recipe............................3 Estate form....................4


that, head to your credit union—an- other cooperative―to make a deposit to cover all your purchases. The cooperative business model promotes self-sustainment and local economic growth. Overall, co-ops are more accessible than other types of businesses. We give our members a voice, and we are local—living and working alongside those we serve. Support our nation’s cooperatives, and local co-ops in northwest Okla- homa, as we work together to build a better world.


Statement of Nondiscrimination


orthwestern Electric Cooperative, Inc. is the recipient of Federal financial assistance from the Rural Utili- ties Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended


and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In accordance with the Federal law and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s policy, this institu- tion is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or disability (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs).


The person responsible for coordinating this organization’s nondiscrimination compliance efforts is Tyson


Littau, Chief Executive Officer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.


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