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Technique By Bryan O’Keefe Tom Smallwood


FIVE STEPS TO MORE VERSATILITY


If you want your average to increase, you must become more versatile.


V


FIVE KEY ADJUSTMENTS • Changing ball speed.


• Changing hand position. • Changing loft.


• Adjusting target distances. • Playing diff erent parts of the lane.


ersatility is important in any sport in which the environment changes. In golf, you must know how to play holes that dog- leg to the left as well as holes that dogleg to the right. In


bowling, you must know how to play lanes that are drier and lanes that are slicker.


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The bottom line is this: If you plan to stand on the same dot and throw the ball with the same speed and hand position over the second arrow from the fi rst frame of Game 1 to the fi nal frame of Game 3, your average is not likely to increase. Lanes change. They break down, transition, etc. Repeating the exact same shot in the exact same spot over and over is going to be a struggle, especially when you get away from the house condi- tions on which you are used to bowling. By adding a little versatility to your game, you’ll be able to make the subtle adjust-


ments that will add pins to your average… and make the game more enjoyable! On the left side of the page you will


fi nd fi ve adjustments you should become familiar with, and practice techniques that will help you become more comfortable when changes in your strategy are required. Mind you, no one is expecting a 160-average league bowler to incorporate all of these variables into his game during the course of a single league night. This is simply a check list of variables that might help.


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TIPS AND TRICKS TO MAKE YOU A BETTER BOWLER


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