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THE MODEL MAKER, JULY 1933, PAGES 234-235; SCAN COURTESY OF THE KALMBACH MEMORIAL LIBRARY OF THE NATIONAL MODEL R.R. ASSOCIATION


King. Delaware & Hudson showed models of coal hauling equipment and facilities. Interestingly, Chicago & North Western exhibited, according to The Model Maker, a 4-8-4 locomotive and “a model of a new Union Pacific streamlined diesel power high speed train,” the as yet un-named M-10000. It makes me wonder if it was a promo- tional version which differed in ap- pearance from the final train. We also know it wasn’t diesel powered, but had EMC’s distillate engine, as a diesel power plant wasn’t ready in time for its introduction; that distinction went to the Budd CB&Q’s Zephyr. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy had


no mention of its development of a streamlined train set, having only a diorama of western scenes with models of railroad-operated buses. It would be the Fair’s second year which saw UP’s M-10000 and CB&Q’s Zephyr race to Chicago, setting speed records, creat- ing newspaper headlines and exciting movie newsreels. Union Switch & Signal Co. displayed


a diagrammatic model of track territory in actual operation with CTC, plus a three-quarters size locomotive cab and front end with train controls. The Cana- dian Exhibit showed a model of a “Northern Type” (Canadian National or Canadian Pacific? It was unidentified in the text.) Curiously, Texaco Company had a model of a passenger locomotive without further description of its type. There were other exhibits in what ap-


RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


pears to have been a large pavilion, but I have noknowledge of them. It was a stimulating place to visit to


satisfy all curiousites, certainly with large ¹/₄″ scale and tinplate layouts which could only spur visitors to want to emulate them at home, albeit on a much smaller scale. It may have been the Dirty Thirties, but there was much hope and inspiration at the Century of


Progress Exposition to bring some- thing bright to a disheartened citizen- ry. It was the first of many 1930’s re- gional expos with large ¹/₄″ scale layouts, culminating with the 1939 to 1940 New York World’s Fair. They gave more impetus to model railroading than any magazine could have. With the onset of World War II, we were nev- er to see their likes again.


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