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Carl’s is a throw-back to the mid-1900’s when local entrepreneurs set up roadside attractions to entice passers-by to stop and part with a little of their hard-earned cash. Who could resist the “World’s


the situation or structure doesn’t need to be based on sound engineering princi- ples as long as it’s somewhat believable. The “concrete” walls were made by pouring a thin, tinted Hydrocal®


mix


into forms made from scribed and dis- tressed .040″ styrene. After the plaster had thoroughly cured, it was lightly stained and dusted with dry pigments to suggest rust stains and goo spills from the Troutateria’s kitchen. The water was prepared by painting the foam surface with acrylic craft paints, lighter tints of green and tan


Smallest Train, Shortest Covered Bridge, or Largest Fish?” A patron riding the tram (above) catches a glimpse of the World’s Largest Fish.” Red (below) enjoys his lunch while sitting in the shade.


toward the shallow edges and darker shades of green, brown and black to- ward the deeper center. Several coats of gloss urethane finish were applied to impart a shiny, slightly undulating surface. The lily pads were punched out of green tissue paper with a thin, pie-shaped notch cut into them. They were attached to the surface of the wa- ter with white glue.


The two most noticeable elements of


the layout are the grass and trees. The grass was made from short lengths of treated jute binder twine. I bought a


6,000-foot roll at my local farm supply and I expect that it will supply my needs for the rest of my life. (My heirs should also have a lifetime supply). I cut the twine into lengths ranging from about a half an inch to a little over an inch long. I then tease one end of the twine while holding the other end tightly to prevent it from unravel- ling. The teasing splays the fibers to better resemble a growing plant. The intact end is dipped into white glue and planted onto the brown painted surface of the layout.


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