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Carl’s Troutateria


of the station to allow access to the two single-seat passenger cars. The “World’s Shortest Covered Bridge” is made using weathered twig posts supporting the roof from a failed large-scale kit project. It is set on piers made from stacks of Schomberg Scale Models large-scale concrete blocks. The figures are mostly Schomberg products. The Troutateria employee in the building comes from an unknown source. The tram rider is from Preiser and Old Sam and his dog, Daisy, are SLM products. Sam’s fishing pole is a cat whisker. What’s a Troutateria without a


tram? Obviously, the layout is set in the days before lawyers freely roamed the earth. A home-built critter made using a single old-style power truck from a Bachmann 44-tonner with Boul- der Valley sideframes and scratchbuilt hood pulls two flat cars with old dining room chairs bolted to them. The cars are built on a pair of spoked, four- wheel lead trucks from Bachmann On30 4-4-0’s. As the story goes, Dave the driver has to stop the train on occa-


fins are made from bits of discarded corrugated roofing. The sculptor that Carl hired to make the fish may not have been particularly talented but he was resourceful. The car is an AMT model of a 1965 Chevelle station wagon, pretty much in stock form. I built a simple roof rack from bits of styrene strip and angle and mounted the canoe on the rack. That’s about it. Since I was building


the layout for this article, I found my- self working with time restraints that I don’t usually experience. For that rea- son, I don’t think that the layout is quite finished yet, and I’m sure that I’ll be adding bits and pieces and details until I feel that I’ve done enough. Maybe these little layouts, just like their big counterparts in the basement, are never really finished.


Dave gives the mysterious passenger a ride on the tram through the tall grass and past the “World’s Largest Fish” (above). A home-built critter powers the tram.


sion to fish a passenger out of the pond when they lean out a bit too far. One of the attractions on the train


ride is the “World’s Largest Fish” on Trout Island. Typical of the common practice of “slight exaggeration” em- ployed by many roadside attractions, the fish of note was made by carving the basic shape from a piece of foam and coating it with polyurethane resin (because I have lots of the stuff). The


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section on the side of the fish where the mesh shows was made by gluing a patch of bridal veil to the form before the resin was applied. After it had set, I dripped lacquer thinner into the fish to dissolve the foam and to hollow the fish. While this technique was effec- tive, if I were to do it again, I would make sure that it was done outside be- cause the house smelled like a paint factory for several days afterward. The


Dedication Carl’s Troutateria is dedicated to the memory of my friend, the late Carl Arendt. Carl was a legend in the world of narrow gauge mini- and micro-lay- outs and was one of the early and ener- getic proponents of Gn15. His creativity, wit and generosity of spirit were an in- spiration to all who enjoy this form of model building. Carl will be remem- bered for his immense talent and sense of fun.


Legend A layout like this needs a legend, so


here it is. Red Boat has just arrived in his brand new 1965 Chevelle Station Wagon. He’s already fitted roof racks


SEPTEMBER 2012


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