This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
the length of the shipping pipe to rein- force the ¹₈″ tube. The coupling between the spout and the pipe is ³₃₂″ tube with an end beveled so that the spout hangs naturally. The bracket from which the chain hangs was formed from .002″ sheet brass and .008″ wire.


Warehouse


Although seemingly simple, achiev- ing a consistently thick, perfectly flat and rectangular casting for the founda- tion was no easy task. The forms were lined with strip styrene to create board impressions in the casting. Clamping the forms to a styrene base was unsuc- cessful, so machined nuts and bolts were used to attach them to a piece of melamine laminate shelving. To insure that the form was perfectly square be- fore final assembly, the diagonal di- mensions were checked to make sure they were identical. Then the form was checked for level, vertically and hori- zontally, and shimmed as necessary. After lightly coating the form with


detergent water (ironically, a sugges- tion to minimize voids in the casting caused by air bubbles), the plaster was poured and a weighted sheet of ³₄″


Loading dock


Absent at Hill City, the loading dock (and warehouse) were modeled from the twin elevator in Fairfield, Idaho, af- ter drawing the structure(s) with CAD. To confirm the correct height of the


dock, a cut-out of the drawing was placed against a boxcar set on a short piece of track. The correct length of the shipping


pipe, without the flexible


spout, was also determined in this manner. Both J. J. Gerber Sheet Metal Works


and Kewanee Machinery and Conveyor Co. made flexible spouts. The Gerber Patent Flexible Telescope Car Loading Spout (in obvious need of an acronym) and the Kewanee Renewable Bottom Grain Spout looked similar. As Kewa- nee advertised, it was “… far less expen- sive to buy new bottoms than to replace entire spouts or try to patch them.” Sim- ply put, the Kewanee “bottom” could be inserted in a section whose bottom had been worn away by grain. Kewanee guaranteed that each of its sections would wear out twelve bottoms. The modeled flexible spout was made from Robart (No. 307) Steel Pin Hinge Points. The centers of the two segments were marked using a small broach, drilled and .028″ brass wire inserted. Opposite sides of each section were drilled and eyelets of .008″ brass wire were inserted in each hole. The eyelets were then opened, the chain strung, and the eyelets closed. The .028″ wire runs


RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


To capture the appearance of the concrete construction of the engine house (top) a styrene form lined with basswood (above left) was used for the plaster cast sides. The doors and windows were made using a wood jig


(above right). The finished engine house (below) has cast plaster sides and ends with a styrene roof, windows and doors.


59


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100