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marking is quite prominent on all the photos I have seen of these cars.


Operating considerations To maintain the accuracy of the car’s weight, the brakes were set manually and not connected to the train line. While this limited the wear on the brake shoes, it created some unique op- erating restrictions.


The first is that the cars were re- quired to be placed immediately in front of the caboose for movement in regular trains. The second was that they placed a speed restriction on the train. On the Lehigh Valley this was 35 m.p.h., but similar restrictions still apply today. I read a comment recently that engineers still hate to see scale test cars in their consist for this reason. During operating sessions, a scale car placed in the consist of a manifest freight not only places a speed restric- tion on the engineer of the train, but re- quires some rethinking by the yardmas- ter and crews to switch the train on arrival at the division yard at Coxton on my layout. With cars blocked for Coxton spotted on the head end, the scale test car on the end of the train requires switching from both ends.


Tamiya Hull Red and Neutral Gray was sprayed on the underside. Chalks were used on the truck to complete


the weathering. A white pencil was used to draw the alignment arrow in the middle of the truck. This arrow or


Add a scale test car to your roster and in operating sessions.They are definite- ly a conversation piece, and I think you’ll find they add an interesting as- pect to your operation.


The CNJ scale test car (above) as well as most test cars were placed in the consist just ahead of the caboose. Many engineers


RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


and yard masters were not happy with having them in a train. Speed restrictions and special accommodations had to be made.


79


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