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It looks like Daisy and Old Sam (above) are in a staring contest (and judging by the stove, it also looks as if the health inspector hasn’t been around in a while). Regular cus- tomers Nancy, Lloyd and Bruce (right) have arrived at the Carl’s. They’re ready to enjoy a unique, outdoor dining experience. Tickets for the tram are sold from the shed seen be- tween the sign and old streetcar (below).


lect several layouts’ worth of very finely detailed “logs” of varying lengths.


I


would guess that my collection could supply many layout builders well into the next millennium. I used the twigs along the river embankment and for structure support. Some of the twigs were carefully ripped on a band saw to produce


rough-sawn planks for the


frame of the station as well as benches and the table beside the Troutateria. There are three buildings on the lay-


out, the central one being the Troutate- ria. This structure began as a novelty trolley bank advertising ketchup prod- ucts. I disassembled the bank and spray painted the component parts be- fore putting them back together. The model is actually a bit undersized for


the layout but you have to look very closely to notice it. The figure of the girl working the stand is small and when placed inside the structure helps to hide the size discrepancy. The kitchen addition was made from illus- tration board with faded construction paper siding held on with stripwood battens. The door and window castings are stock parts from my Schomberg Scale Models product line. To hide the obvious seam between the addition and the trolley I used a piece of three- ply facial tissue soaked with tan col- ored paint and laid over the roof joint to represent a tarpaulin. The concrete blocks prevent the tarp from flapping when the breeze picks up. The signs for Carl’s Troutateria and


the train ride were made on my comput- er and printed on regular paper. The back of the paper was sanded quite vig- orously to thin and wear holes in it. The signs were attached to the “plywood” backing boards with white glue. The sheets of “plywood,” by the way, are thin pieces of birch veneer sold as business card blanks by a company called Lee Valley Tools in Canada. The station was constructed to re-


semble, more than anything else, a chicken coop because that is what it was used for previously, or so the story goes. It is set on weathered twig piles and the frame is constructed of rough- sawn twig timbers. It has a short set of steps leading up to the entrance, and there’s a folding ramp at the track side


RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


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