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and he’s on his way for a paddle in his canoe, which in a distant moment of poetic serendipity, he named “Little Red.” Nancy, Bruce and Lloyd have just finished their lunch and are talking about how business isn’t what it once was. Maybe it’s the new highway that by-passed Carl’s, or it could be that trout shakes and muffins just aren’t as popular as they once were. The fact is that the crowds aren’t coming like they used to. The tram is still running, and today it has a rider. He’s not from around these parts so the speculation is that the stranger may be someone look- ing for an investment. More likely, he heard about the place and decided to take the train ride while he was here. The world is changing and Carl’s Troutateria will have to change with it, whether the locals like it or not.


Notes


Gn15 is a relatively new scale and gauge combination which is very popu- lar in Great Britain and Europe and is quickly gaining a following in North America. We are familiar with Bach- mann’s excellent On30 products. They use HO scale standard track gauge in O scale. That measures out to roughly 30 inches, hence the On30 designation “O” for O scale, “n” for narrow gauge


Red’s new ‘65 Chevelle station wagon (above), complete with a canoe tied to the roof, sits in the lot at Carl’s while Red enjoys his lunch. That’s Red sitting on the bench (below).


and “30” for the distance between the rails). In half-inch scale, G, this works out to a gauge of about 15″ so we have Gn15. This is a very workable scale and gauge combination because it al- lows for the use of both HO and On30 drive mechanisms to power “critters.” Small layouts are possible because the


track curves can have a radius as tight as four inches.


The best source for on-line informa- tion about Gn15 modelling can be found at: www.gn15.info, or go to www.carendt.us for the site that Carl started and is now run by dedicated volunteers.


RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN


47


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