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The Belling way 1912


• Founded by Charles Belling in a shed in Enfield, Belling produces its first fire, first immersion heater and the ‘Dinkie’ kettle


1919 • Belling manufactures its first complete domestic cooker, the Modernette


1922 • The launch of the ‘Cookerette’, the forerunner to the Baby Belling


1925 • Belling relocates to Bridge Works, a 24,000 sq ft facility


1929 • Launch of the No. 2 Baby Belling cooker, the first of the Baby Belling line


1931 • Belling launches the first all-enamel cooker, the first in the industry


1932 • A new Regent Street showroom is opened


1935 • Launch of the first cooker with glass doors, an industry first


1937 • Belling launches the ‘Streamline’ cooker, the first cabinet-style cooker ever made


1940 • WWII sees Belling switch to production of hand grenades, mortar bombs, food cabinets for aircraft, rocket guns, bomb snuffers and ammunition boxes


1946 • Commenced the manufacture of ‘Vee’ cookers for the new pre-fab houses


1947 • The business began to export, sending senior staff to America and Europe. The No. 47 Cooker is introduced


1951 • No. 51 ‘Wee Baby Belling’ introduced, followed by the No.53 Big Baby Belling in 1952


1955 • Belling added to its 306,000 sq ft of premises with a further 100,000 sq ft site in Burnley


1962 • On its Golden Jubliee, Belling receives the Royal Warrant as Manufacturers of Electrical Appliances to Her Majesty The Queen


1965 • Company founder, Charles Reginald Belling dies on 8th February aged 80 and is succeeded by his cousin, Richard Belling.


Hundred years in business


What makes Belling special? On the eve of the brand’s centenary celebrations, Belling chief executive, Denver Hewlett told Anna Ryland what gives the brand its staying power and a unique place in the UK market.


role in cooking history in Britain – from launching the first slot-in cooker and the first fully enamelled appliance, to patenting glass oven doors; creating the first fan oven and making induction technology available to the mass market.


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“In my opinion, the most important development for Belling since 1992, when the GDHA Group purchased the Belling brand from receivership, was the launch of the Belling Cookcenter in 1997 which followed Belling’s entry into the range cooker sector with the Farmhouse cooker in 1994,” said Denver Hewlett, chief executive of Belling. “It transformed Belling from being an OK company to a unique one in the market. This product had many novel features, including a work burner on the hob. It was a ‘serious’ range cooker with four ovens, a six burner hob and great looks. It gave us confidence for the future – it transformed our business as it also was a commercial success.


34 The Independent Electrical Retailer May 2012 ince 1912, Belling has played a key “The group always looked to acquire


great brands which have fallen on hard times. Belling was one of them: its heritage was great, its products were unique. Belling was the first venture of the Group into the major domestic appliances. During the 1980s and 1990s regional electricity companies were selling electric cookers but when they stopped doing this, cooker manufacturers didn’t capitalize on this opportunity straight away. We spotted the gap in the market.


1938 Baby Belling


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