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CL AS S NO TE S


“great joy,” reports Alison. She works for Project Empower, a nonprofit that sup- ports women in recovery from substance abuse and addiction. She teaches dance and exercise to women at a drug treat- ment center and works part-time as a per- sonal trainer. Adam Shayevitz is busy as senior strate-


gic sourcing manager at a high-tech start- up. The company is developing a new generation of user-friendly, low-cost in - dus trial robots. ROBYN TARALLO DRAINVILLE 103A KIM TERRACE STOUGHTON, MA 02072-1368 ROBYND@WEAREWCI.ORG


’85


Class Participation 24% Legacy Society 8 / FOP Donors 7


Singer-songwriter Chrys-Anthony Booker teams up with Oakland-based producer Drunken Monkey on the extended-play album The Diggin’ Pony, which was re - leased in 2011 on Splintered Tree Records. The EP features Chrys-Anthony singing jazz, funk, and soul-inspired pop tunes and includes tracks influenced by under- ground electronic dance music. He is also featured on Bay Area DJ J-Boogie’s recent album Under cover, also released last year. Music and more can be found online at chrys-anthony.com. CINDY PENDLETON 81 SMITH ROAD CHARLTON, MA 01507 CROPEN1985@GMAIL.COM


’86


Class Participation 33% Legacy Society 4 / FOP Donors 17


In September Jan Halper Scaglia brought eldest daughter Elana ’15 to Skidmore to begin her freshman year. “I am still in shock,” says Jan. The word from Elana was that the preorientation was “amaz- ing.” Jan looks forward to visiting Skid - more often and showing Elana her old hangouts. At the end of summer, Jan and her husband joined Holly Cressy Davis, Rob Davis, Coline Paimblanc Riviere, and Linda Perry Feaster, along with spouses and children for a total of 16, on Cape Cod for the group’s third mini- reunion. “It was a great week!” notes Jan. In Hurricane Irene, the Scaglias lost an 80-foot tree that fell “the right way” (not on the house) and were without power for a week. Jan says, “It was an adventure, and thanks to great friends we fared rather well.” Jerry Rickrode is in his 27th year of coaching (his 20th as head basketball coach) at Wilkes University. He and wife Kathy live in Mountain Top, PA, with


children Jordyn, 14, and Christian, 12. The couple has been married for 22 years. Despite having much of his time occu-


pied by work, Andreas Schneider reports that he and his family did a lot of touring while visiting Germany last year, includ- ing a trip along the Rhine and stops in Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Tübingen, Met zingen, Wiesbaden, Eltville, and Heidelberg. Barbara Neulinger’s oil paintings are on display in Landformed: Pattern & Geoform, which runs until January 27 at the Primo Piano Livin Gallery in Lecce, Italy. Barbara says, “My current work explores the ab - stract possibilities and associations within crystal forms. I am organizing faceted shape and color as well as reflected and refracted light.” ANNE CHORSKE STUZIN 206 RIDGEWOOD ROAD BALTIMORE, MD 21210-2539 ANNE@STUZIN.COM


’87


Class Participation 20% Legacy Society 3 / FOP Donors 11


Class reunion co-chair Laura Ship pee Hart has launched a Facebook group, “Skidmore Class of 1987,” and encourages classmates to check it frequently to recon- nect with old friends and get up-to-the-minute news about our 25th reunion, which will be held on campus May 31–June 3. She hopes to see you there! Laura’s daughter Emma, a high school junior, attended Columbia University’s perform- ing arts program last summer; she intends to study performing arts in NYC and attended Columbia’s open house with her parents. Eva, 15, plays soccer and basket- ball; her team was ranked fourth out of 145 in a basketball tournament at Penn State. Robert, 13, also plays hoops. Elena, 11, another basketball enthusiast, also loves to sing. The family spent lots of time traveling to tournaments over the summer (racking up 2,600 miles in just two weeks), but they enjoyed the family time and seeing different parts of the country. Husband Bob Hart (from the old Tin & Lint days) coaches three out of their four kids’ teams. Laura runs the Jolly Tar retail store in Bay Head, NY, with her mom Evalyn Zoda Shippee ’59. Laura says she draws upon her Skidmore educa- tion daily as an event planner, business- woman, and mom. This past summer Gregory Rutchik and Erin Stern (sister of Eric Stern ’90) visited


AT WORK The business of art F


or Maria DeMarco Beardsley ’85, heading the exhibition department at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City perfectly com- bines her student interests: a practical ground- ing in business and a late bloomer's passion for the arts. Beardsley majored in business, a choice she thought sensible at the time for someone who didn't know what she wanted to do. Then, on a lark in her last semester, she took an art class. “It’s the only class I ever dropped,” she says with a laugh. The work seemed hard, and she just wanted to have fun. “But I kept going to class— something about it really piqued my interest.” After gradua-


MAY 31–JUNE 3


tion, she got a job on Wall Street, but it wasn’t a good fit. She realized she liked being around creative people, and she started re searching other career paths, including calling on Skid - more alums who worked in the arts. She ap - plied for museum jobs and took an entry-level ac counting position at MoMA. At the same time, she was taking art history courses toward a master's degree. Four years later, she moved to MoMA’s exhibitions group. “It became clear that I didn’t want to be a curator,” she says. “I liked the administrative side. My business background was a plus.” Now Beardsley deals with budgets and con-


tracts, handling the works of the masters and of up-and-comers. “Planning a show for archi- tecture models is quite different from one with high-value Matisses and Picassos,” she says. “I’m still a strong advocate of liberal arts education—almost to the point of being old-fash- ioned,” she says. She’s surprised by how job- focused many students are today. “You should go to school to learn how to think, to gain breadth. Job skills can be learned as needed.” —Jill U. Adams


WINTER 2012 SCOPE 57


CREATIVE THOUGHT CHARLIE SAMUELS


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