This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Search and replace Alumni turn curiosity into new discoveries


Preparing seekers, pioneers, and problem-solvers has long been a priority for Skidmore, and lately it’s working to expand the opportuni- ties for such training. Offering a wide range of thesis, capstone, lab- oratory, and studio research, it’s no wonder Skidmore ranks as a top producer of Fulbright grant winners, according to an October Chron- icle of Higher Education. And many graduates build on the competen-


Brain mapping


Scott Hayes ’98 is constantly evolving his research designs to stay ahead in the fast-moving world of neuroscience technology. A biology and psychology major with a PhD from the Uni-


versity of Arizona, he teaches psychiatry at the Boston Univer- sity School of Medicine, conducts experiments at the Memory Disorders Research Center, and helps direct imaging for the Veterans Administration Boston Healthcare System. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging—a key tool in map- ping brain activity while patients are actively using their brains—Hayes studies the neurological processes of cognitive functions such as memory.


Hayes says some of his work has focused on the influence of visual context on memory performance. Another big ques- tion in memory research is neuroplasticity: “the ability to adapt to insult related to neuropathol - ogy such as Alzheimer’s disease, or to neurologi- cal injury such as from


“THIS IS A NEW RESEARCH


PATH FOR ME—LOOKING AT HOW PHYSICAL FITNESS CAN IMPACT THE


NEURAL UNDERPINNINGS OF HUMAN MEMORY.”


SCOTT HAYES ’98 USES FUNCTIONAL MRI SCANS TO ADVANCE MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT ALZHEIMER’S AND OTHER MEMORY PROBLEMS.


hypoxia or stroke, or even to aging processes.” Hayes explains there are different types of memory—procedural, semantic, and episodic—and much of his research is with episodic mem- ory, which is impaired by Alzheimer’s. He recently obtained a grant from the VA’s Rehabilitation Research and Development Service to study the influence of aerobic fitness on memory and neural activity in aging and in mild cognitive impair- ment. He says, “This is a new research path for me—a little more applied, looking at how physical fitness can impact the neural underpinnings of normal human memory.” Hayes considers Skidmore his leaping-off point for his career in brain research. He credits a Williamson Scholarship, targeted to students from Ohio, for allowing him to even consider at- tending Skidmore. “At the time I graduated, I liked both of my majors, but I went back to Ohio without a job,” he recalls. “Then I received a tip from the psychology department about a research assistant position at Princeton.” Denise Evert, then a new professor at Skidmore, knew of Hayes and told him about the assistantship at her alma mater. At Princeton for two years, Hayes went on to the University of Arizona, choosing very specific coursework and clinical rotations in neuroimag- ing and clinical neuropsychology.


g WINTER 2012 SCOPE 21


cies or content from their Skidmore projects to forge professional ca- reers in research. Scope readers know about cancer researchers Pat Harran ’90 and Jonathan Brody ’92, market and finance analyst Gail Dudack ’70, civic-engagement scholar Rich Harwood ’82, marine bi- ologist Penny Chisholm ’69, and scores of other alumni making dis- coveries in crucial fields of knowledge. Below, meet a few more:


MARK MORELLI


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72