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CL AS S NO TE S CREATIVE THOUGHT Eye on women’s health A


s editor of the Harvard Women’s Health Watch, Carolyn Schatz ’70 knows that


when it comes to health concerns, “there’s a ton of information out there, much of it unreli- able, sensationalized, or lacking context.” She says the primary goal of HWHW is to “provide reliable information that women can use in mak- ing decisions about their health care.” Geared toward women approaching or past menopause, the monthly newsletter has roughly 130,000 subscribers.


Schatz, an English major who earned a mas-


ter’s in broadcast journalism from Boston Uni ver - sity, previously spent nearly 20 years at NBC News, where she developed and pro- duced sci- ence and medical stories. She says “people can get a


little cynical” about what they perceive as mixed messages from the medical establishment: “One week, coffee’s bad for you, the next week it’s not, and now it’s actually good for you. Eggs are bad; eggs are good.” Part of the issue, she believes, is that the public hears information when it’s still just “a step in the scientific process rather than a conclusive finding.” HWHW aims to “put seeming advances in medical knowledge into context.” In considering topics to cover, Schatz some- times finds inspiration close to home. “For exam- ple, I wrote about sleep-maintenance insomnia— where you wake up too early and can’t get back to sleep—after polling my book group about their most vexing health issue. And we ran an article about hospital delirium after a close friend had to deal with it in two elderly relatives.” Additional ideas come from medical journals, the FDA and National Institutes of Health, and Harvard Medical School and affiliated hospitals. The newsletter “often serves as a kind of


‘partner in health’—something women take with them to their doctors’ offices,” Schatz says. She adds, “It’s rewarding to hear from readers that an article we wrote helped them in some way, be - cause that's what we're here for.” —MTS


JULIA GROSSE BRODHAG 1025 REGENCY DRIVE CHARLOTTE, NC 2821 SKIDDIE71@GMAIL.COM and NURSING CORRESPONDENT: SERENA ROTH BATEMAN SBATEMAN71@SKIDMORE.EDU


’72


Class Participation 38% Legacy Society 15 / FOP Donors 11


Seven years ago Janet Olotka Dugdale and husband Ray moved from Newbury - port, MA, to Kittery, ME. They live on a tidal creek and enjoy kayaking as well as camping, hiking, and traveling. Ray, who spent 35 years in banking, is now a VP at BDC Capital Corp., offering financial products to banks. Janet is in customer service for the Culver Company, providing safety and conservation materials for utility companies. Daughter Julie, 32, grad- uated from Wil liam and Mary and has a master’s in environmental journalism from the University of Colorado. As sen- ior editor for the magazine 5280 in Denver, her adventures have included bungee jumping and alligator wrestling. Son Brian, 31, graduated from George Wash ing ton and earned a law degree from the University of Connecticut. His firm, Watt, Tieder, Hoffer & Fitzgerald, was recently cited as the nation’s top con- struction-litigation firm. Last fall Janet and Ray visited all five national parks in southern Utah and had a Thanksgiving visit in Moab with their kids. Susan Smeragliuolo Opie is sorry to miss our 40th reunion, but she’s renting a place on Pawley’s Island with her chil- dren. She suggests a mini-reunion some- where for herself and others who can’t return to Saratoga. She is going through some “midlife things” and says Sue Groes - beck and Emily Stein have been good friends through it all. In October she vis - ited Emily in the Big Apple and plans to return to Toronto soon to see Sue and Mark. Susan’s kids are in NYC, Char lottes - ville, VA, and Princeton, NJ—all a short three-hour drive away. She has two won- derful grandsons (each of her daughters, Jessie and Abby, has a boy), who are “a real hoot.” Susan’s son Sam has been mar- ried for a year. Mary Crombie Geer owns Acorn Stu -


MAY 31–JUNE 3


dio, a graphic-design business in her Glas - tonbury, CT, home. She says she is glad she loves her work, because that’s how


50 SCOPE WINTER 2012


she spends most of her time. “There are no exotic adventures or exciting travels. I just find each day—which can bring a new project, client, or deadline—challeng- ing.” She takes care of dogs as a side busi- ness and owns two horses, Domino and DJ, whom she visits every day and rides twice a week with her riding buddies, known as the TOBs (Tough Old Birds). Mary looks forward to Reunion and hopes to meet up with some art majors there. Nancy Gilday Spark’s husband, Mi - chael, was recently named vice commo - dore of the Mantoloking Yacht Club near their home on Long Beach Island off the Jersey shore. Retired from the building business, he is still active with a youth sailing program. Their son Michael spends summers on Martha’s Vineyard, running waterfront activities for the Harbor View Hotel in Edgartown, and winters in Aspen and Vail, CO, where, last year, he worked in production for TV-8. Newlywed daugh- ter and husband Keith moved from the San Francisco Bay area to Chicago before settling in Stamford, CT. Keith is in the shipping industry, and Jen works in PR. Nancy is glad they live close by. Nancy works in real estate. She sees Suzanne Cahill Sayia often; she and her husband and growing family, including grandkids, spend a lot of time on the Jersey shore. The Sparks don’t have grandkids yet; as Nancy says, “All in good time.” Lesley Graham survived the EF5 tor -


nado that struck Joplin, MO, in May, as her part of town was spared. For the 200th episode of the TV show Extreme Makeover, seven damaged houses in Joplin were renovated in seven days. “It has been an amazing recovery effort and is still going on,” Lesley says. Earlier in the year, she visited Keppie Miller Sullivan in southern California and “had a blast.” Lesley is a field service manager and train- er for Management Recruiters Interna - tional. She hopes to make it to Reunion and still can’t believe it’s been 40 years! Her father, a homebuilder in Joplin, passed away last January. Also looking forward to our 40th is Sue


Bartholomew Owings, who hasn’t been back to campus in 10 years and is ready “to hear and tell lots of stories.” She is an educator in Vermont. Daughter Emma, a twin, gave birth to twins in 2010; she lives in an apartment attached to Sue’s house. Sue feels privileged to be able to watch the babies grow every day. In 2010 she and husband Kenny fulfilled an item on their “bucket list,” visiting the Grand Canyon, which Sue says “was as breath- taking as I had imagined.”


AT WORK


KEIRNAN CONROY KLOSEK ’95


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