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in addition to trains operating from Grand Central Terminal and 125th Street-Harlem station. The new 153rd Street-Yankees station is designed to handle up to 10,000 customers an hour, posting Metro-North conductors at the gates to collect fares before the fans board their train for home. Across town, fans of the New York


Mets had to learn some new names starting in 2009 as well. The new Citi Field replaced old Shea Stadium, but the ballpark continues to be served by the IRT No. 7 Flushing Line of the NYC Subway and the Long Island Rail Road’s Port Washington Branch, both at stations renamed Mets-Willets Point. A unique three-track express station


serves Mets-Willets Point along the No. 7’s Queens-to-Manhattan route. The original station opened in 1927, at the time a relatively minor stop. In 1939, the station stop was moved west to its current location and expanded to han- dle the crowds expected to visit the World’s Fair. Mets fans were welcomed for Shea Stadium’s inaugural season in 1964. New express service to Manhat- tan was introduced in 2007 to help bring home fans after weeknight games, which was then expanded in 2008 to include weekend games as well. The LIRR station was originally


opened for the 1939 World’s Fair, and was used between 1946 and 1952 while the United Nations had their tempo- rary home at Flushing Meadows. The station was again reopened in 1961, and in 1964 the Mets had their first home season at Shea Stadium, coinci- dental to the opening of the 1964/65 World’s Fair. The station was renamed Shea Stadium in 1966, until the open- ing of the new Citi Field in 2009 prompted yet another name change. The Port Washington Branch bypasses the major transfer point at Jamaica,


34 APRIL 2012 • RAILFAN.COM


TOP: Yankee fans board waiting Metro-North commuter trains on July 3, 2009, at the new Yan- kee Stadium. Located on the Hudson Line, the station is served by special Harlem and New Haven Line trains on game days. The new station comfortably handles the post-game crowds by posting conductors to collect fares before boarding. RON YEE PHOTO MIDDLE: A southbound IRT No. 4 subway train rattles over the elevated tracks past new Yankee Stadium on April 2, 2009. The center track is used for bi-directional express service. ABOVE: A painted sign advertises MBTA services to Fenway Park for Red Sox games. The oldest ballpark in the major leagues is served by both light rail and commuter rail. PHOTOS BY ANDREW GRAHL


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