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YOU CAN TAKE THE TRAIN TO THE GAME


Take Me Out to the Ball Game


BY OTTO M. VONDRAK/PHOTOS AS NOTED


WHAT COULD BE MORE AMERICAN than baseball and trains? Many cities build- ing modern cathedrals to baseball are also enjoying new rail service for the first time in a generation or more. Some cities continue to rely on the same trains that have been in place since the turn of the last century. While


we don’t have room to review every ma- jor league ball park, here’s a sampling of what’s available from coast to coast.


West Division The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim


play at the appropriately named Angel Stadium of Anaheim, their home since


1966. The Anaheim station is jointly served by Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner corridor service and Metrolink’s Orange County Line commuter trains, along tracks formerly owned by BNSF Railway. Opened in 1984, the station is located on the north side of the Angel Stadium parking lot. Metrolink offers


ABOVE: What’s better than watching baseball and trains at the same time? On October 1, 2009, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim hosted the Texas in a mid-afternoon start. Vladimir Guerrero is at bat against Kevin Millwood of the Texas Rangers, in the bottom of the first inning as Am- trak Pacific Surfliner 579 (in push mode) rolls into the Anaheim station at the northern edge of the stadium parking lot. DAVID STYFFE PHOTO OPPOSITE: It’s opening day for the 2010 baseball season in San Francisco, as a MUNI light rail train stops alongside AT&T Park, as seen from the fairway beneath the upper left field grandstands inside the stadium. The fans are still streaming in to see the Giants take on the Atlanta Braves. The Bay Bridge can be seen in the background. RICHARD SUGG PHOTO


30 APRIL 2012 • RAILFAN.COM


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