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THE BUSINESS TRAVEL MAGAZINE I 39 The Review ➔ May Fair's suite dream


Suite sleeps, expensive wash bags, airport pods and smooth landings – welcome to The Business Travel Magazine's Alternative News page


THE ALTERNATIVE NEWS MONEY BAGS


PICTURED above is the ‘Most Excellent Bedroom’, according to the Conde Nast Johansens 2012 UK & Ireland Awards for Excellence, that is. The snappily named awards ceremony declared the Schiaparelli suite at London’s May Fair Hotel the winner on the


grounds of its “attention to decorative and theme detail and unique interior design that makes it stand out from the crowd.” Gushing on, the testimonial continued, “From the hot pink palette and luxurious fabrics to the Buddhist accents, it embodies the


unique and luxurious quality that one looks for in that special hotel bedroom.” Still, once the lights are off, you might as well be in a Travelodge, as the saying sort of goes. Rates for the Schiaparelli suite – one of 11 signature suites at the May Fair – start from £1,900.


WHERE would we be without a tenuous Travelodge press release on these pages? We don’t like to disappoint, so here we bring you news that the average value of a traveller’s wash bag and contents is an astonishing £156.69. The budget hotel chain commissioned the survey after spending ‘hundreds of hours reuniting 10,000 wash bags with their owners’. In one case, a customer paid over £100 for a courier to deliver their designer toiletry bag home as it contained nearly £1,000 worth of cosmetics. The survey also showed that a third of women said their toiletry bag was the most important item they pack when travelling, and that men spend 81 minutes a day on personal grooming, including 23 minutes in the shower.


PURPLE POWER


IF YOU’VE seen a purple pod skirting round the fringes of Heathrow’s T5, we can confirm it’s the airport’s transit system for passenger making their way from the Business Car Park to the terminal. The pods will carry an estimated 500,000 people a year on the smooth and virtually silent ride along a 3.8km guideway. They have room for up to four passengers and their luggage and operate on demand at the touch of a computer screen.


BARRA AIRPORT DRAWS A LINE IN THE SAND


THE sandy airstrip of Barra in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides has been voted the world’s most stunning airport landing in a poll conducted by PrivateFly, an online booking portal for private jet charter. The beach is the only such airstrip in the world used for scheduled flights, which are carefully planned around high and low tide times. Runner up was London City Airport, with its steep approach featuring stunning views of the capital’s famous skyline and iconic buildings such as Big Ben, the London Eye and the Olympic Park. Third was Jackson Hole Airport


in Wyoming, set amid the spectacular scenery of the Grand Teton National Park. Rounding out the top ten were Aruba Airport, the Maldives' Malé Airport, St Barts Airport, Queenstown Airport


(New Zealand), Gibraltar, Narvik Airport in Norway and St Maarten. PrivateFly’s CEO, Adam Twidell,


says, “It’s interesting to note that most of the airports on the list are smaller ones rather than major


international airline hubs – including the winner, tiny Barra. The voters have reminded us all that flying can be a thrilling highlight of any journey, not just a means of getting there.”


54 I THE BUSINESS TRAVEL MAGAZINE


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