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Spotlight A 42


On...


s avid collectors of Southwestern art, Ted and Betsy Rogers could not think of a better locale for a secondary home than Santa Fe, N.M. However,


their 2,200 sq. ft. home in Santa Fe’s historic district did not provide adequate area to display their extensive collection. To create more space for both art display and offices, the Rogers family expanded their home with a 5,000 sq. ft. addition. As part of this major renovation, the family realized


they needed a water and home heating system that could accommodate both the size of the addition and carry them through the cold winter months in Santa Fe. With an average wintertime low of 16 degrees and a record of 29 degrees below zero, the Rogers family needed a system that was both reliable and energy efficient. “Primarily, we were looking for reliability,” said


homeowner Ted Rogers. “Because this is a second home


This 7,500 sq.-ft. home in Santa Fe, N.M., houses a large private collection of Southwestern art and relies on two 96% efficient A. O. Smith Cyclone Xi units as the heart of a radiant heating system. The Cyclone units send hot water to 11 zones to keep the home comfortable during the coldest weather. An A. O. Smith Vertex residential gas water heater powers an outdoor snowmelting system.


Next, to cover their need for domestic hot water, the


Rogers family installed a third Cyclone Xi water heater. Each Cyclone Xi unit installed in the home is a 199,000 BTU commercial water heater. The glass-lined Cyclone Xi has powered anodes for tank protection, resulting in a state-of-the-art water heater with money-saving 96 percent thermal efficiency. To combat Santa Fe’s severely icy winters, the Rogers family installed the A. O. Smith Vertex™ residential gas


A. O. Smith provides whole home solution for heat, hot water and snowmelt systems


for us, we spend about four months out of the year here, including time in the winter.” Rather than heating their home using the conventional


“forced air” method, the Rogers family elected to use a more energy-efficient radiant heating system in both the new and old sections of the house. The entire radiant heating system is supported by two 96 percent efficient A. O. Smith Cyclone®


Xi units—one a primary heater,


the other functioning solely as a backup unit. By dividing the home into 11 independent heating zones, each with a programmable thermostat, the family is able to conserve energy by heating each zone based on its individual need. “Conventional heaters don’t deliver 96 percent


efficiency,” said Steve Drinkwater, application engineer for A. O. Smith. “With the Cyclone Xi, the homeowners could save 35 to 40 percent on energy compared to conventional standard efficiency forced air heating systems. They should see a return on investment in two years or less.”


e Circle 33 on reader reply form on page 111


water heater, a 100,000 BTU high efficiency unit, to power a snowmelt system. Monitored by external moisture and temperature sensors, the Vertex is activated when the outdoor walkways or stairs begin to freeze. The system heats and circulates an ethylene glycol solution with the help of a secondary heat exchanger. Ethylene glycol, an antifreeze-like liquid, then effectively melts any snow or ice that may develop. The installation of A. O. Smith’s Cyclone Xi and


Vertex products has been an all-in-one high efficiency heating solution for the Rogers family. Even in a short time, Ted Rogers has already noticed a difference in his energy bills. “There are significant energy savings here,” said Rogers.


“We just had one heater before. Now that we’ve doubled the size of our house and we’ve had the A. O. Smith equipment put in, our overall heating bills have still gone down by 20 percent.” ;


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phc december 2011 www.phcnews.com


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