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Student entrance for the main building at Burleson Centennial High School.


Spotlight On...


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BURLESON, TEXAS— A series of successful installations has made construction manager Cliff Holden a big believer in tankless water heating systems for the school- building projects he oversees. Since 2007, the 15-unit Burleson (Texas) Independent School District (BISD) has erected six new educational facilities under Holden’s direction, and the latest three have all featured multiple- unit, tankless solutions — in no small part because he wholeheartedly championed the idea. The most recent project, Centennial’s hot-water delivery strategy, features three multi-unit systems,


(CMC) handled the plumbing and HVAC work at Centennial as well as at Clinkscale and the Academy. BISD and general contractor Charter Builders of Dallas chose CMC because of the latter’s expertise in geothermal systems, having completed more than 60 such projects in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex over the past 16 years. A geothermal solution was especially critical at Centennial because it is a two-story structure, explains project manager Chad Kroeker, P.E.


Installation — involved, but not difficult Kroeker regards the multiple-unit strategy as a huge


advantage for any application that simply cannot do without hot water for any duration. “You see a lot of


550,000-square-foot Centennial High School complex is the latest successful tankless project for the Burleson (Texas) Independent School District, with 25 units in three systems delivering hot water to food-service and culinary arts kitchens, locker-room sinks and showers, and plumbing facilities in the field house.


commercial applications, especially restaurants and schools, with two tank heaters whose total storage capacity roughly matches the peak demand of the project. As a result, if one goes down, the operation doesn’t have enough hot water. “Everyone — our maintenance director, the


administration and the school board — is pleased,” he


Texas school district embraces multi-unit, tankless water heating systems for their ‘sizable’ space-and energy-saving advantages


encompassing a total of 25 tankless water heaters from Noritz America. These units feed food-service and culinary kitchens as well as locker-room sinks and showers in the main building; plus locker room facilities in the adjacent, standalone, indoor-practice field house.


Friday Night Lights It is also worth noting that energy efficiency was not


the primary driver behind Holden’s first move to tankless in 2007 at the school district’s football stadium. At that juncture, the facility had been using a pair of 400,000 Btu per hour (Btu/h) gas-fired boilers, installed earlier in the decade, to provide hot water to the locker rooms. The big negative with these units involved irritatingly high maintenance costs, recalls Holden: “Half the time, one of the boilers wasn’t working. The annual repair costs were tremendous and ongoing. Besides also having to cope with state inspections, we just weren’t comfortable with this big, 400,000 Btu ‘bomb’ sitting there, waiting to go off if something in the system malfunctioned.” As a result, BISD began looking for less-costly


alternatives, ultimately opting to go tankless. Holden replaced both stadium boilers with 10 Noritz 199,000 Btu/h tankless water heaters, installed in parallel for the sake of system redundancy; that is, never doing without hot water if one or more of them needs maintenance. Holden admits. “We really didn’t require 10 units to serve peak demand at the stadium; it turned out half that number was enough.” Fort Worth-based Century Mechanical Contractors, Inc.


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continues. “We learn a bit more about tankless system sizing and design with each project. But I fully expect the school district will remain supportive of our use of tankless water heating on future projects.” . ;


www.noritz.com


Project manager Chad Kroeker (left) and Cliff Holden, construction manager for the Burleson (Texas) Independent School District, shown with the ten-unit tankless water heater system for the indoor practice facility.


phc december 2011 www.phcnews.com


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