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INDUSTRY NEWS Crown Boiler U launches new class


PHILADELPHIA— Crown Boiler Co. is proud to announce the addition of the Bimini Buddy Basics course to their online learning center, Crown Boiler University. The course will join the Bimini Boiler Annual Inspection and Service course and bolster the training options offered in the Bimini Boiler Training section of Crown Boiler University. This introductory course covers the


fundamentals of the Bimini Buddy hydraulic separator, which is designed to simplify the installation process of the Bimini boiler. In the Bimini Buddy Basics course, students will learn what hydraulic separation is, the benefits of the Bimini Buddy and what differentiates each Bimini Buddy model. It is free to enroll in the Bimini Buddy Basics course through Crown Boiler University, and


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enables contractors to earn CEUs towards their NATE and NORA recertification at their own pace. Crown Boiler University is a free


online learning center designed to promote and encourage education. Through the University, contractors will have access to training 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Crown Boiler University is offered by Crown Boiler Co., a leader in the hydronic heating industry. Begun as Crown Industries in 1949, Crown Boiler now supplies an established network of independent and regional wholesalers, as well as some of the largest national HVAC wholesale chains. Over the years, Crown Boiler has remained true to its guiding principles of delivering quality products with outstanding customer service. For info, www.CrownBoiler.com.


MIRO Industries, Rooftop Anchor open manufacturing facility


HEBER CITY, UTAH— MIRO Industries, Inc. and Rooftop Anchor Inc. have moved their corporate headquarters to a new 30,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Heber City, Utah. The new manufacturing facility will house engineering, sales, service, factory and administrative


staff and include custom metal fabrication, product manufacturing, product testing and shipping. The new finished facility will


employ 30-40 workers by the end of 2011. “The location and the quality of the local workforce were key points in our decision to purchase this property in Heber,” said Nate Sargent, president of both MIRO Industries and Rooftop Anchor.


NSF International publishes First American National Standard for water reuse systems


ANNARBOR, MICH.— NSF International has published the first American national standard for commercial and residential onsite water reuse treatment systems, NSF/ANSI 350. The new standard complements NSF’s expanding scope of environmental standards and sustainable product standards, which help establish criteria for and clear methods of evaluating environmental and sustainable product claims. NSF/ANSI 350: Onsite Residential


e Circle 11 on reader reply form on page 111


and Commercial Reuse Treatment Systems establishes criteria to improve awareness and acceptance of water reuse technologies that reduce impacts on the environment, municipal water and wastewater treatment facilities, and energy costs. According to the American Water Works Association, 84 percent of residential water is used in non- drinking (non-potable) water applications such as lawn irrigation, laundry and toilet flushing. Residential and commercial builders, architects and regulators are turning to onsite wastewater reuse systems as a solution to increasing water scarcity and energy costs associated with the treatment and distribution of municipal water and wastewater.


phc december 2011 www.phcnews.com


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