This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Modeling a PRR camp car


sides mark an “A” and “B.” This makes a big difference later on because it lets you know which end and side is which. When you start making changes in the windows it is nice to have them end up


Work car conversions usually had windows plated over where heaters and the like were installed (right). Other windows were made to be “open” on the model, so the lower portions of the sashes were removed and new horizontal pieces glued across the openings, as shown here (below).


where they belong, not “backwards.” I used a marker pen and also scribed the letters and numbers on these parts (in hidden spots) with a sharp knife so when painted they could still be read to match the appropriate part. I’ll leave it up to you as to what un- derbody details you need. I didn’t add some of the fittings since they were tak- en off during the conversion to camp car service. You could either check a prototype car for underbody detail or follow what is on mine (see the photos). Assembling the trucks comes next,


which was the only thing I thought was hard, but if I can do it, so can you. I rec- ommend placing the trucks on a glass surface to make sure all the flanges are sitting on the surface. I always slide a piece of paper under the flanges to see if a wheel is off the flat surface. Mount the trucks on the underbody, then put on a set of couplers and make sure the model will go around the curves on your railroad. I did cut off a small amount of the plastic centering spring tabs, found in the instructions in the coupler sec- tion, so it would ease the tension on the Kadee couplers going around the curves. I wanted to get the car up and run-


ning before I started on the car sides. This is the time to make sure it tracks 100 percent, not after it is painted and decaled. With this done, remove the trucks and couplers and go on to the carbody. Now we can start on the sides. After looking at prototype pictures you need to make a decision concerning which windows to blank out. The filler pieces can be cut from .010″ styrene. Just take your time when fitting these window


78 DECEMBER 2011


blanks in place. Note that these sleep- ers had two different size windows, so when cutting and fitting fillers be aware of this. You can also cut out the bottom win-


dow sash to have a partly open window. I did this using a small file (very care-


fully), as the bottom of the window sash is very thin, then I added No. 122 Ever- green Scale Models .020″×.040″ styrene strips to create the rest of the sash to show that the window was part- ly opened. That size strip lays very nicely in the recessed area on the inside


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com