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bottom plates and individual studs. As specified in the original diagram, the studs are spaced at 24″, with the over- all wall having a height of 8-0″. I want- ed to be able to lift off the top of the shed to show the interior, so I chose not to attach the walls to the floor, instead joining them to each other at each cor- ner. I also framed the door and the win- dows. again using 2″×4″ lumber. With the framing of the walls com-


pleted, I moved on to the exterior. The original plans specify lap siding, and I’m a fan of clapboard siding on wood structures, so clapboard siding was the obvious choice for covering the outside of the shed. I didn’t want to use commercial sheet siding for a cou- ple of reasons. First, I wanted this shed to look somewhat “worn out” and weatherbeaten, difficult to do with the uniform look of sheet siding. Secondly, I just don’t like the looks of the stuff. I


much prefer the look of individual boards.


The plans call for 4″ lap siding,


which, of course, requires 6″ boards. I cut a few 10′-0″ pieces of 2″×6″ and be- gan installing them onto the outside of the framed walls. To help align the boards, I marked the walls at 4″ inter- vals, starting from the bottom up. I had finished half of the first wall when I re- alized that something was wrong, I didn’t like the looks of the siding. After studying it for a few minutes, I decided that the siding was too thick. I needed to use something thinner than 2″ boards, but what? Styrene was the ob- vious next choice, but I’m not a fan of styrene masquerading as wood. I stripped off the wood siding before the glue was fully dried, and went off in search of a better material.


I’ve seen some outstanding modeling online that was done using various pa-


pers, so I thought that might be an op- tion. I knew that my wife had a large assortment of scrapbooking papers, so I decided to rummage through them to see what I could find. I found some heavy paper which, according to my digital caliper, was 0.29mm thick. If you do the math, this converts to 0.98″ in HO scale, making it usable as 1″ lumber. This paper also had a textured pattern embossed into it, giving it a look and feel almost like wood grain. I decided to “borrow” a sheet of this for my wood siding. (If she happens to read this, sorry dear, I’ll buy you a re- placement sheet.)


Using a straightedge and hobby


knife I cut several strips of this paper, ten scale feet in length, six scale inch- es in width, making sure to keep the textured “wood grain” running length- wise. I then proceeded to glue these strips onto the framed walls, aligning


5′-2″


DM&N Rwy. Handcar shed Drawn by Ken Lawrence


Full size for S scale: 3


/16″=1′-0″: 1:64


16′-0″ 5′-8″


5′-2″


6′-0″


Drawing by Ken Lawrence 3′-0″ 18′-0″ 11′-8″ 4′-0″


2″x8″ sills 2″ plank floor 1″x4″ joists RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN 51


5′-0″ 10′-0″ 13′-6″


5′-0″


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