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While the terrain is somewhat different at St George, the general arrangement of track, bridge, and apron on the model (top left) are close to the prototype. The extra vertical post that crept unnoticed into the model is visible between the second and third pan- els. The deck of the apron was laid using in- dividual pre-stained boards, while scribed sheet was used on the deck of the finger pier. The difference is quite evident. The fin- ger pier provided ready access to the out- side of the bridge, and also helped to keep the float bridge in position against wind and tides. At the lower end of the bridge you can see the top of the bearing structure.


bridge would make a great model. Al- though I had no layout at the time, I was building models in preparation for “the day when.” On a mid-week day off a few weeks later I found myself stand- ing in the St. George yardmaster’s of- fice confronted by a slightly bemused gentleman whom I had finally made to understand that I wished to measure his float bridge for a model. After a moment he decided that, since operations in the yard were finished for the time being and would not resume till late in the evening, he would allow me to do what I wanted at the float


This view (left) provides some idea of the number of n.b.w.’s needed for the model. They add a lot of character to the finished piece. The four diagonal braces for the out- er trusses are visible. There is a “steel” strap at the bottom which keeps that end from kicking out, and the top end is bolted through the upper chord. The bearing plates for the truss rod ends are plainly visible along the top of the upper chord. Their counterparts on the bottom of the lower chord were not modeled, as they would not be visible. The plates visible on the top of the lower chord provide bearing for the U-hangers that support the floor beams. Each floor beam has two hangers at each truss, a total of six for each beam.


There is a lot of detail on the outboard end of bridge (right). At the left, on the inner face of the truss, are the two winding wheels for the winch on that side. At the end of the center truss you see the hy- draulic ram that was used to help bring the deck of the float and that of the bridge into alignment so the toggle pins could be driv- en home into the staples on the deck of the barge. Immediately adjacent to the hy- draulic ram, one of these toggle pins can be clearly seen. The low profile ground throw can be seen, alongside the center truss, near the top of the photo. The steel pontoon (float) that supports the outer end of the bridge, and lends the bridge its name, can also be seen. It extends from the last diagonal side brace to the end of the bridge. At least one of the lines from each winch should run to a bitt on the float. However, since the author needs to be able to remove the float they are laid out on the deck of the bridge.


RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN 57


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