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Planting can Save Energy Next


Fall Summer


Hidden Account Number If you see your account


number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your elec- tric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newslet- ter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account


number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


Most of us plant trees and shrubs in the spring, but cool tem- peratures and lots of rain make fall a good time for planting, too. Planting shade trees near the windows on the sunny side of your house can block heat and damag- ing UV sunrays from getting inside during air conditioning season. Ev- ergreens near the house can block the wind and keep it from blowing through windows when you’re trying to keep your home warm in winter. A few tips for fall planting: ● Plant in September and early October to allow enough time for roots to establish before the cold weather stops the tree from grow- ing.


● Start your trees and shrubs in burlap or containers rather than planting their bare roots into the


Remember....


NFEC members can pay their electric bills at any Great Plains National Bank location, including the branch inside the new Elk City Wal-Mart.


ground in the fall. ● Ask a landscaper or an expert at your garden center which variet- ies of trees do well when planted in the fall. Some, like red maple, birch, poplars and some oaks do much better when planted in the spring. ● Water plants frequently and thoroughly after planting. They need about an inch of water a week until the ground is frozen. ● Wrap the trunks of young trees with burlap or plastic in late November to protect them from frost, sunburn and animals. Re- move the wrap in the spring. ● Spread a thick layer of mulch around newly planted to trees so freezing and thawing of the soil won’t heave them out of the ground.


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