This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
your CO-OP PAGE 8  SEPTEMBER 2011 LET’S SAVE ENERGY TOGETHER


Is there a big screen in your future? Careful—that high def TV burns a lot of energy


BY JOHN DRAKE cooperative energy auditor


F


ootball season is here, which means die-hard pigskin fans will be spending a lot more Saturdays in front of the TV. And that buddy with


the big screen? Well, he’s is everybody’s best friend.


Dinosaurs like me still remember the days of large console televisions with wood grain exteriors, rabbit ears and a broken knob that required needle nose pliers if you wanted to change the channel. Today’s televisions offer larger, thinner screens and, thanks to digital cable or satellite connections, an unlimited number of channels.


The problem is some models require a tremendous amount of energy to operate—


almost as much as a refrigerator. Now, consider the average American household owns at least two TVs and you can see how this energy use adds up.


In response to consumer concerns, TV manufacturers are designing sets that use less energy without sacrificing screen size or resolution.


If you’re in the market for a new TV, or want to make sure you’re using your current TV efficiently, I’m throwing our a few tips.


High-Definition=High Energy Use


Although a high-definition TV (HDTV) transforms movies into a theater-like experience, these sets use more power because of better picture clarity. Also, the larger the screen, the more electricity


required.


Four types of TVs are currently available: plasma, liquid-crystal display (LCD), rear projection, and cathode ray tube (CRT). CRT televisions are the most difficult to find because they employ old technology and screen sizes rarely top 40 inches.


Plasma screens often are the largest energy user because their large 42-inch to 65- inch screens typically draw between 240 watts to 400 watts. Most consume electricity even when turned off.


LCD TVs don’t need much power to operate—111 watts on average. Most LCD screens range in size from 21 inches to 49 inches. These TVs fall into two categories: those with cold-cathode fluorescent lamps to illuminate the screen; and backlit models employing a light-emitting diode (LED). LED units offer several benefits, notably better picture quality and thinner and lighter screens. They also use slightly less energy, at 101 watts.


Rear projection televisions tend to be the most energy efficient and offer the largest screen sizes. But due to their overall weight, rear projection sets are hard to find.


If you’re shopping for new TV, you’ll find most manufacturers rarely advertise energy consumption. It’s best to conduct your own research. Try online sources such as CNET. com, an online journal for the tech industry.


For energy use questions or to schedule a free energy audit, please call John Drake or Mark Zachry at 800-780-6486, ext. 233.


Tune in to Savings


If you’re not in the market for a new TV but want to make sure your model is operating efficiently, these tips from CNET.com may help you save energy:


 Turn the TV and other connected devices off when they’re not being used.


 Turn down the LCD’s backlight— you’ll save energy and still retain better picture quality.


 Turn on the power saver mode, which many new TVs offer.


 Control room lighting. While many energy-saving tips reduce brightness of the screen, you can compensate by dimming lights around your TV.


CEC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80