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examine the tree for green healthy buds and keep it watered if the weather stays dry. If your tree has no full green buds and is all brown with many leaves still attached that is usually the sign of its demise. The best way to revive a stressed out tree that is still showing signs of life is to apply a fertilizer application this fall. I would recommend this be done in early November after the trees go dormant and drop their leaves for the year. It’s really best to wait for the leaves to natu- rally fall off, generally after the fi rst freeze, and then apply half pound of tree fertilizer per inch of trunk diameter, measured at 12 inches up from the ground. As an example, a 10-inch diam- eter tree would get fi ve pounds of fertilizer spread in a circle around the tree, stretching out under the branch tips. People always ask about fertilizing shrubs such as azaleas and hollies in the fall. Generally this is not a good idea, as it may encourage growth that will be subject to cold damage. But be ready to apply fertil- izer in the late winter and spring to help your plants


resume normal healthy growth next season. This summer has been the ultimate test for all plants in the landscape.


"This summer has been the ultimate test for all plants in


the landscape." - Allan Storjoham


The types of plants that made it through in fair- ly good shape should be noted and promoted for greater use in Oklahoma. The ones that burned up, struggled through or just completely died will need to be re-evaluated. In your own yard you might need to dig up and move plants that were in too much sun, or go with new ones that showed that they can take the exposure to heat and drought.


So in summary, start by as- sessing the damage done by the summer’s heat, remove dead plant parts, continue to water if rain is not adequate,


fertilize trees in the fall and shrubs in the spring and fi nally, replant with new healthy and hopefully more drought-tolerant plant types, so when the next heat wave hits the plants will not be casualties like they were this record-breaking year. OL


_____________________


Allan serves as manager for Oklahoma City’s Myriad Gardens and hosts a popular radio show on KRMG out of Tulsa. He can be reached by email at algardens@cox.net.


A Building That Stands Out Service That Stands Above the Rest


The Morton Buildings difference is in more than just the strength and beauty that lies in our construction methods. Morton employees have the experience to handle every aspect of your building project. From helping you plan your building’s layout to manufacturing components, delivering building materials and constructing your building, Morton is with you every step of the way. Morton also stands behind your building with the strongest, non-prorated, non-pass-through warranty in the industry.


Whether you need a general storage building, horse barn, hobby shop, garage or commercial building, Morton has a building for every style and budget.


Equestrian | General Purpose | Hobby Shops | Farm Storage | Homes | Garages #70-4330


If you’ve been thinking about a new building, contact Morton Buildings today. With endless features and options, you and your sales consultant can plan for a building that truly meets your needs.


Three offices located throughout Oklahoma to serve you.


800-447-7436 mortonbuildings.com


© 2011 Morton Buildings, Inc. All rights reserved. Country Craft Buildings are not available in all locations. A listing of GC licenses available at mortonbuildings.com/licenses.aspx. Reference Code 613


SEPTEMBER 2011 25


Photos courtesy of Biomass and Energy of Oklahoma.


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