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If by chance you have been west of Granite or in the Mangum I don’t know about you, but for me


this has been the longest, hottest, and driest summer I can remember. As I write this we are still having 100 degree days, but hopefully by the time you read this article


the temperature will have cooled off a bit. I think we’re all ready for some fall weather, and with that school and football games. We’ve obviously had some extremes in our seasons. The


summer of 2011 will be one to remember just like the winter of 2010. Hopefully the years to come will bring some milder seasons. I think we’re due some relief. It’s hard to believe we are still dealing with the consequences


of the worst ice storm in our history. I thought I would take this opportunity to give you an update on where we are on the repair process. For months we have known we had an enormous amount


of repair work to complete due to the ice storm. After months of working with FEMA, we finally received the approval to move forward. Since that time we have been busy planning, engineering, staking, and purchasing the necessary material. As of the first of July we were finally able to award the contract for the re-conductoring portion of the FEMA work and in mid July the work finally began.


and Duke area, you may have noticed contractor crews changing the conductors. This is quite an undertaking due to the fact that the work is done while the lines remain energized. Consequently, the Granite and Duke subs have been kicked off a few times. For that we do apologize. Every effort is being made to change the conductors safely, but when you have that many wires on one pole, accidents can happen. Fortunately, no one has been injured. We understand that service interruptions can be an inconvenience but we also pray the lineman remain safe. We have a tremendous amount of work left to do. We still have


around 100 miles left to re-conductor. This is just the first phase of the rebuilding work. While the re-conductoring work is going on, we continue working with FEMA to get approval on the next phase which is the re-spanning. This involves changing the poles as well as the wire. This is just an estimate, but it will probably be after the first of the year before we can begin this next phase of the rebuild. Going through this whole process is a massive undertaking. It has added a tremendous amount of workload and stress to our staff. Life would be much simpler if we were not dealing with the aftermath of devastation from the ice storm. But, we do this for you, the member. As stewards of your cooperative we believe it’s absolutely necessary and will improve the service reliability now and in the future. From time to time we’ll give you updates on the repairs.


Hopefully things will continue to move forward in a timely manner and there will be no interruptions in service. The board, management, and employees goal is to continue to bring you safe, reliable service at an affordable cost.


Dear Mr. Paxton, I would like to thank you for giving me the opportunity to come to the Leadership Camp. I am having an amazing time all thanks to you!


Is your washing machine more than 10 years old? According to the U.S. Department of Energy, families can cut related energy costs by more than a third — and water costs by more than half — by purchasing a clothes washer with an ENERGY STAR label. Choose a front-load or redesigned top-load model. 337501


Source: U.S. Department of Energy


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES - Lisa Richard, Editor The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated


rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Charles Paxton ......................................................................................... Manager


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter ..................................................................................................District 1 Jim Reeves ....................................................................................................District 2 Clinton Nesmith .............................................................................................District 3 Bob Allen .......................................................................................................District 4 Burk Bullington ..............................................................................................District 5 Jean Pence ....................................................................................................District 6 Billy R. Nowell ................................................................................................District 7 Charles Horton .............................................................................................. Attorney


Monthly Board of Directors meetings Held Fourth Thursday of Each Month Sincerely, Ericka Garcia


Dear Charles Paxton, More than anything I want to thank you for providing such an amazing experience. I have a memory that will last a lifetime but also Colorado will remember a tiny piece of Hollis, Oklahoma. I thank you and hope you will continue this fantastic experience for Harmon County.


Sincerely, Liana Mingura


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service


to take outage reports and dispatch ser- vicemen. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, call our office at 688-3342. Any other exchange area call toll free, 1-800-


643-7769.


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


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