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CO-OP LIVING


a variety of familiar colors and can be dimmed. “Halogen offers a big effi ciency advantage over standard incandescent bulbs,” says John Strainic, global product general manager, GE Lighting. “It consumes fewer watts while delivering a precise dim- ming capability and a bright, crisp light.” The most familiar options on the market today— and most economical—are CFLs. The technology operates the same as fl uorescent lighting in offi ces or the kitchen. The bulbs are now available in a wide array of colors and some can be dimmed. Always check the package to make sure a bulb meets your needs.


According to Schuellerman, CFLs are generally best used anywhere where lighting is left on for ex- tended periods and full brightness is not immediate- ly necessary, such as family rooms, bedrooms, and common areas. As with all fl uorescent bulbs, each CFL contains a small amount of mercury (fi ve times less than a watch battery) and should be recycled. Many retailers offer free CFL recycling; visit www. epa.gov/cfl for details. The fi nal choice (remember the fi refl ies?) is LEDs. Although still developing, you can fi nd LED lights, recessed fi xtures, and some lower wattage replace- ment bulbs on store shelves.


“LEDs are the up-and-coming solution,” predicts Schuellerman.”As they come down in price, home- owners will embrace them. Currently, most residen-


tial LEDs are used for outdoor lighting where fi x- tures are left on for extended periods and changing bulbs is not easily done. LEDs are also great for lin- ear applications like under cabinet lighting, where light sources with thin profi les are needed.” LEDs are more expensive than other options: a replacement for a 60-W incandescent bulb costs be- tween $30 and $60. But costs will fall as manufactur- ers respond to growing consumer demand. For example, in 2008 LEDs comprised 10 percent


of the output from CREE Inc., a Durham, N.C-based lighting manufacturer. Fast-forward three years and LEDs are responsible for 70 percent of the compa- ny’s businesses, and bulb effi ciency has doubled. In- novations like a new production line last year are driving down costs.


LEDs are not without their problems—they have to stay cool to operate effi ciently, and when several bulbs are placed together for a brighter, more con- sumer-friendly light, lifespan decreases. However, many manufacturers are accounting for this by add- ing cooling elements to LED bulbs. Some bulbs fea- ture a spine design to allow air to fl ow around the base; other models have fans built into the ballast.


Can You See a Difference? Some consumers believe more efficient bulbs won’t provide the same warm look and feel as clas- sic bulbs, but Schuellerman disagrees.


“Lighting technologies are advancing at such a rate that consumers won’t notice a marked differ- ence in the color of light from different technolo- gies or how that light is dispersed. You also won’t necessarily see a difference in bulb shape. Some con- sumers don’t like the look of twist-shaped CFLs, for example, so we offer covered CFLs that look just like incandescent bulbs. We also have an LED bulb that is a replacement for a 40-watt incandescent, as well as halogen bulbs, that both are housed in incandes- cent-shaped shells.”


The difference will be found on your monthly elec- tric bill—more effi cient bulbs use between 25 and 80 percent less energy than traditional incandescents, and last much longer. The U.S. Department of En- ergy claims each household can save $50 a year by replacing 15 traditional incandescent bulbs. “With these new technologies, homeowners will be spending less on electricity bills for lighting and changing fewer bulbs,” says Schuellerman. To learn about lighting options, visit energysav- ers.gov/lighting. For details on the change and shopping tips visit ftc.gov/lightbulbs. OL


Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Energy Informa- tion Administration, Federal Trade Commission, Cooperative Research Network, LUMEN Coalition, GE, Sylvania, Philips.


Megan McKoy-Noe writes on consumer and cooperative af- fairs for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.


September 15 - 25


g(with outside


ate admission)


11_OKLAHOMALIVING_9.5x5.75_HALFPAGEcolor.indd 1


SEPTEMBER 2011 7 8/13/11 4:29 PM


Disney On Ice presents Disney/Pixar’s Toy Story 3


THURS., SEPT. 15 @ 7:30 pm FRI., SEPT. 16 @ 7:30 pm


Easton Corbin


SAT., SEPT. 17 @11:30 am, 3:30 pm & 7:30 pm


SUN., SEPT. 18 @ 1:30 pm & 5:30 pm MON., SEPT. 19 @ 10:30 am & 7:30 pm TUES., SEPT. 20 @ 7:30 pm


Chesapeake Energy Stage (The 30th Anniversary of “Elvira”)


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 @ 7:30 PM


The Oak Ridge Boys


Now you can purchase a one-day unlimited carnival ride wristband, good for the Main Carnival Lot, in advance, and receive an outside gate admission ticket, at no additional charge (if purchased by September 14) at all tickets.com outlets including the State Fair Arena Box Office.


4


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or visit us at okstatefair.com!


STATE FAIR ARENA BOX OFFICE OR CALL 1-800-511-1552


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 @ 7:30 PM


Thurs., Sept. 15 .. ELI YOUNG BAND Fri., Sept. 16 ....... LEON RUSSELL Sat., Sept. 17 ...... CANDY COBURN Sat., Sept. 17 ...... LEE BRICE with Candy Coburn Sun., Sept. 18 ..... ALLSTAR WEEKEND Mon., Sept. 19 .... SANCTUS REAL Tues., Sept. 20 .... ELVIS EXTRAVAGANZA Wed., Sept. 21 .... ELVIS EXTRAVAGANZA Thurs., Sept. 22...TEXACO COUNTRY SHOWDOWN Fri., Sept. 23 ....... EN VOGUE Sat., Sept. 24 ...... VILLAGE PEOPLE Sun., Sept. 25 ..... CENTENNIAL RODEO OPRY


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