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Save Energy by Saving Water The less water you use, the less


energy is required to get that water to your home. If it’s hot water you’re saving, you also could see a dent in the water-heating portion of your energy bill.


Here are seven ways you can save water in your home: 1. Replace your old toilets. If your toilet is from 1992 or earlier, it probably uses 3.5 gallons of wa- ter for every flush. Newer models use as little as one gallon. Those that use less than 1.28 gallons per flush – 60 percent less than your older toilet – can save a family of four more than $90 a year on the water bill.


2. Fix leaky faucets. One drip per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons of water each year. Even if you don’t see a leak, check your water meter twice over two hours. If the two readings don’t match, you probably have a leak. 3. Stop your toilet from run-


ning. A leaky toilet can waste about 200 gallons of water every day. Here’s how to tell if it’s leaking:


Hidden Account Number If you see your account


number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your elec- tric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newslet- ter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account


number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


water per load, while high-effi- ciency models need less than 28 gallons. To save even more, run the washer only when it’s full. 5. Take a shower. It takes 70 gallons of water to fill a bathtub, but you’ll only use 10 to 25 gallons during a five-minute shower. 6. Turn off the faucet while you brush your teeth. Two gallons of water flow out of a faucet every minute it’s turned on. That’s water down the drain if you’re letting it run while you brush your teeth. You could save 240 gallons of water a month if you turn off the


Place a drop of food coloring in the tank. If the color shows up in the water in the bowl before you flush, you have a leak.


4. Buy a high-efficiency wash- ing machine. The average washing machine uses about 41 gallons of


tap while brushing your teeth in the morning and at bedtime.


7. Switch to “drip” irrigation. If you’re running a sprinkler system to water your lawn, about half of the water it sprays is “watering” your patio, driveway or street. A drip irrigation system, which liter- ally drips water right on the plant that needs it, uses between 20 per- cent and 50 percent less water. You could save more than 2,000 gallons of water over the drip irrigation system’s lifetime.


Dimming Lights can Save Energy


If you’re looking for a quick way to save on your electricity bill, install a dimmer switch. Dimmer switches reduce a


lamp’s wattage, which can save you money while giving the room a cozy feel.


If you have already switched to


energy-efficient compact fluores- cent light bulbs, choose those that are labeled as compatible with dim- mer switches. It’s not safe to use an incompatible compact fluorescent with a dimmer, even if you keep the dimmer on full light.


And be aware that not all CFLs can be dimmed. Read the pack- age’s label. You’ll find dimmer switches at any hardware or home store, and they’re are easy to install. Before you start, cut off the circuit breaker to that switch and use a voltage tester to be sure the circuit is dead.


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