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Northfork Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER


BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ...................... Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres ............... Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas .......Erick Lendell Stowers ...........................Carter Chris Mackey ................................Sayre Larry Smith.............................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton ..........................Sayre Danny Davis ...............................Elk City Jack Ivester .............................. Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Kenny Waugh ........... Dir. Adm. Services Jeff Mohr ........... Mgr. of Acct. & Finance Kay Brown ..................... Adm. Assistant Richard Bowdre ...........Operations Mgr.


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope ......................655-4557


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) or


(580) 928-3366


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


DATES TO REMEMBER READINGS MUST BE IN NORTHFORK OFFICE BY THE 10th


OF EACH MONTH


TO BE USED FOR BILLING


ADDRESS PO BOX 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 311 E. MADDEN


Fall Planting can Save Energy Next Summer


Most of us plant trees and shrubs in the spring, but cool temperatures and lots of rain make fall a good time for planting, too. Planting shade trees near windows on the sunny side of your house can block heat and damaging UV sunrays from getting inside during air conditioning season. Evergreens near the house can block the wind and keep it from blowing through windows when you’re trying to keep your home warm in winter. A few tips for fall planting:


• Plant in September and early October to allow enough time for roots to establish before the cold weather stops the tree from growing. • Start your trees and shrubs in burlap or containers rather than plant- ing their bare roots into the ground in the fall. • Ask a landscaper or an expert at your garden center which variet- ies of trees do well when planted in the fall. Some, like red maple, birch, poplars and some oaks do much better when planted in the spring. • Water plants frequently and thoroughly after planting. They need about an inch of water a week until the ground is frozen. • Wrap the trunks of young trees with burlap or plastic in late Novem- ber to protect them from frost, sunburn and animals. Remove the wrap in the spring.


• Spread a thick layer of mulch around newly planted to trees so freez- ing and thawing of the soil won’t heave them out of the ground.


Raise the Temperature a Little; Save a Lot


The U.S. Department of Energy says you can save 10 percent a year on your heating and cooling bills by simply setting your thermostat 10 degrees higher in summer or back in winter – for eight hours. You can do this automatically without sacrificing comfort by installing a program- mable thermostat.


But cranking your thermostat way up whenever you leave the house


won’t necessarily reduce your air conditioning bill. Here’s what doesn’t work:


1. Changing the thermostat setting for short periods several times a


day. If you’ll be gone for less than six hours, leave your thermostat where it is.


2. Lowering the thermostat to 60 degrees when you get home to kick


the AC into high gear and cool the home quicker. That doesn’t cool your home off any faster, but it will use more energy than if you set the thermo- stat to a reasonable temperature. Your best bet: Set it and forget it.


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