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34 CASESTUDY


O2 INTEGRATES IT FOR INSTORE EFFICIENCY AND SERVICE


O2 has more customers than any other UK mobile operator network and 490 retail stores. With customer service being a priority, O2 wanted to make the point-of-sale experience as quick and convenient as possible


We’ve seen some major differences in the speed, accuracy and simplicity of driving sales. A major and complex upgrade, which was rolled out smoothly, has resulted in more effi cient, sophisticated and user-friendly processes


on separate IT systems. This resulted in the customer being asked for certain details more than once to ensure data was captured in both systems. O2 decided to overhaul the procedure to make the point-of-sale (PoS) experience as quick and convenient as possible by integrating the billing and payment systems. That year O2 implemented a major upgrade to


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its existing Torex Power-PoS systems to integrate the payment and billing systems across all its stores. Torex Power-PoS brings together all elements of O2’s business operations into one solution that helps increase overall productivity and facilities management control. The update to the system means that the PoS now fi nds data in the billing system and pulls this into the PoS payment system, prepopulating all fi elds that have already been covered, including customer information and tariff details, which are automatically matched. Where the system does not have the necessary information it can fi lter data to offer appropriate selections, further speeding up the overall process.


The update to the system was rolled out in August 2009 in partnership with IBM, which provided a billing


n early 2009 the processes of signing an O2 customer up to a mobile phone contract and paying for their transaction were being carried out


system, and Torex, who deployed the whole estate in 16 days. Torex Power-PoS is designed to retrieve data from


the separate payment and billing systems in a fast and effi cient way, taking no more than a couple of seconds. This means that when a customer is taken to the PoS following the billing procedure, the PoS can retrieve data from the IBM billing system and populates all the duplicated fi elds linked to the handset’s unique IMEI number, saving time and improving the customer experience again as a result. In total, the upgrade has led to time savings of


four minutes per transaction, double the original requirement. The link between the two systems automatically identifi es anomalies, where previously there were only manual checking mechanisms in place for spotting inaccurate data entries. With the new system, each manager is freed up for


three to four hours per week per store and, with 490 stores nationally, this means a saving of approximately 1,680 hours a week across O2. These signifi cant time savings have given managers and sales staff more time to interact with customers, drive sales and focus on store improvements at a local level. The system and adjustments are also very simple from an end user perspective. The advanced technology with its easy-to-use interface was designed by Torex to be intuitive meaning that O2 sales staff didn’t require specifi c training to use the systems and there was minimal disruption to the business.


With a huge amount of different data to capture, the O2 implementation is the most advanced of all Power-PoS projects Torex has developed to date and the whole project came in on time and to budget, exactly as O2 wanted, bringing benefi ts from both a commercial and customer service perspective. Mike Gadd, O2 retail systems manager, commented: “The project has been a huge success and we’ve seen some major differences in the speed, accuracy and simplicity of driving sales. A major and complex upgrade, which was rolled out smoothly, has resulted in more effi cient, sophisticated and user-friendly processes.”


RETAIL TECHNOLOGY JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011


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