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CASE STUDY #4

Socio-economic benefits from grassland restoration projects, South Africa

In the Drakensberg mountains, local communities depend heavily on various ecosystem services for their livelihoods. By restoring degraded grasslands and riparian zones and changing the regimes for fire management and grazing, early results sug- gest that it may be possible to increase base water flows during low-flow periods (i.e. winter months when communities are the most vulnerable to not having access to any other source of wa- ter) by an additional 3.9 million m3. Restoration and improved land use management should also reduce sediment load by 4.9 million m3/year. While the sale value of the water is approxi- mately € 250,000 per year, the economic value added of the ad-

CASE STUDY #5

Limestone Quarry Restoration in Perth, Australia

Application of smoke to the topsoil seedbank within post-mined restoration sites in Australia results in a trebling of seedling emer- gence success. Whilst ‘smoke tents’ were employed during the research phase in the 1990’s (left), scientists have now discov- ered, isolated and have the capacity to synthesize the chemical in smoke responsible for seed germination. This, together with

other germination tools and techniques such as seed pelleting and correct topsoil handling, paves the way for restoration prac- titioners to achieve high species return on ancient landscapes within the biodiversity hotspot of southwestern Australia (right).

Photo credit: Deanna Rokich. Source: Wetland Care, Australia

ditional water is equal to € 2.5 million per year. The sediment reduction saves € 1.5 million per year in costs, while the value of the additional carbon sequestration is € 2 million per year. These benefits are a result of an investment in restoration that is estimated to cost € 3.6 million over seven years and which will have annual management costs of € 800,000 per year. The necessary ongoing catchment management will create 310 per- manent jobs, while about 2.5 million person-days of work will be created during the restoration phase.

Source: Maloti Drakensberg Transfrontier Project (MTDP), 2007.

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